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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Comorbidity and mortality after hip fracture in nineteen thousand six hundred and eighty two patients aged eighteen to sixty five years in Denmark from 1996 to 2012

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PURPOSE: This nationwide study assessed associations between comorbidity and mortality after hip fracture in young and middle-aged patients.

METHODS: Data on 19,682 patients aged 18 to 65 years were extracted from Danish registries out of 154,047 patients who experienced a hip fracture between 1996 and 2012. Mortality and comorbidity were assessed using information on vital status, hospital admissions, and prescriptions.

RESULTS: Of the 19,682 patients 17,722 (90.0%) were middle-aged (40-65 years) and 1960 (10.0%) were young (18-39 years). The 30-day mortality rates were 3.2% (n = 570) and 1.6% (n = 32), respectively. Indicators of multi-trauma (hazard ratio (HR), 3.5 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.6-7.8], n = 2056) and having diabetes (HR, 4.4 [1.2-11.3], n = 59) and heart disease (HR, 4.4[1.3-14.8], n = 57) increased 30-day mortality in the young patients, while having cancer (HR, 5.0 [4.2-5.9], n = 1958) increased 30-day mortality in the middle-aged patients.

CONCLUSION: Heart disease and diabetes were associated with high mortality in the young patients while having cancer was associated with high mortality in the middle-aged patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Orthopaedics
ISSN0341-2695
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Mar 2019

    Research areas

  • Age, Comorbidity, Diabetes, Heart disease, Hip fracture

ID: 56891990