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Combinations of SNP genotypes from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Study of bipolar patients

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OBJECTIVES: Combinations of genetic variants are the basis for polygenic disorders. We examined combinations of SNP genotypes taken from the 446 729 SNPs in The Wellcome Trust Case Control Study of bipolar patients.

METHODS: Parallel computing by graphics processing units, cloud computing, and data mining tools were used to scan The Wellcome Trust data set for combinations.

RESULTS: Two clusters of combinations were significantly associated with bipolar disorder. One cluster contained 68 combinations, each of which included five SNP genotypes. Of the 1998 patients, 305 had combinations from this cluster in their genome, but none of the 1500 controls had any of these combinations in their genome. The other cluster contained six combinations, each of which included five SNP genotypes. Of the 1998 patients, 515 had combinations from the cluster in their genome, but none of the 1500 controls had any of these combinations in their genome.

CONCLUSION: Clusters of combinations of genetic variants can be considered general risk factors for polygenic disorders, whereas accumulation of combinations from the clusters in the genome of a patient can be considered a personal risk factor.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Neuropsychiatrica (Online)
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
ISSN1601-5215
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Dec 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 52216704