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Collagen density regulates the activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells

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@article{1ed513554ecd4c34b9ea458d3be98796,
title = "Collagen density regulates the activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Tumor progression is accompanied by dramatic remodeling of the surrounding extracellular matrix leading to the formation of a tumor-specific ECM, which is often more collagen-rich and of increased stiffness. The altered ECM of the tumor supports cancer growth and metastasis, but it is unknown if this effect involves modulation of T cell activity. To investigate if a high-density tumor-specific ECM could influence the ability of T cells to kill cancer cells, we here studied how T cells respond to 3D culture in different collagen densities.METHODS: T cells cultured in 3D conditions surrounded by a high or low collagen density were imaged using confocal fluorescent microscopy. The effects of the different collagen densities on T cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation were examined using flow cytometry. Cancer cell proliferation in similar 3D conditions was also measured. Triple-negative breast cancer specimens were analyzed for the number of infiltrating CD8+ T cells and for the collagen density. Whole-transcriptome analyses were applied to investigate in detail the effects of collagen density on T cells. Computational analyses were used to identify transcription factors involved in the collagen density-induced gene regulation. Observed changes were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis.RESULTS: T cell proliferation was significantly reduced in a high-density matrix compared to a low-density matrix and prolonged culture in a high-density matrix led to a higher ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells. The proliferation of cancer cells was unaffected by the surrounding collagen-density. Consistently, we observed a reduction in the number of infiltrating CD8+ T-cells in mammary tumors with high collagen-density indicating that collagen-density has a role in regulating T cell abundance in human breast cancer. Whole-transcriptome analysis of 3D-cultured T cells revealed that a high-density matrix induces downregulation of cytotoxic activity markers and upregulation of regulatory T cell markers. These transcriptional changes were predicted to involve autocrine TGF-β signaling and they were accompanied by an impaired ability of tumor-infiltrating T cells to kill autologous cancer cells.CONCLUSIONS: Our study identifies a new immune modulatory mechanism, which could be essential for suppression of T cell activity in the tumor microenvironment.",
author = "Kuczek, {Dorota E} and Larsen, {Anne Mette H} and Marie-Louise Thorseth and Marco Carretta and Adrija Kalvisa and Siersb{\ae}k, {Majken S} and Sim{\~o}es, {Ana Micaela C} and Anne Roslind and Engelholm, {Lars H} and Elfriede Noessner and Marco Donia and Svane, {Inge Marie} and Straten, {Per Thor} and Lars Gr{\o}ntved and Madsen, {Daniel H}",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1186/s40425-019-0556-6",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "68",
journal = "Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer",
issn = "2051-1426",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Collagen density regulates the activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells

AU - Kuczek, Dorota E

AU - Larsen, Anne Mette H

AU - Thorseth, Marie-Louise

AU - Carretta, Marco

AU - Kalvisa, Adrija

AU - Siersbæk, Majken S

AU - Simões, Ana Micaela C

AU - Roslind, Anne

AU - Engelholm, Lars H

AU - Noessner, Elfriede

AU - Donia, Marco

AU - Svane, Inge Marie

AU - Straten, Per Thor

AU - Grøntved, Lars

AU - Madsen, Daniel H

PY - 2019/3/12

Y1 - 2019/3/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: Tumor progression is accompanied by dramatic remodeling of the surrounding extracellular matrix leading to the formation of a tumor-specific ECM, which is often more collagen-rich and of increased stiffness. The altered ECM of the tumor supports cancer growth and metastasis, but it is unknown if this effect involves modulation of T cell activity. To investigate if a high-density tumor-specific ECM could influence the ability of T cells to kill cancer cells, we here studied how T cells respond to 3D culture in different collagen densities.METHODS: T cells cultured in 3D conditions surrounded by a high or low collagen density were imaged using confocal fluorescent microscopy. The effects of the different collagen densities on T cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation were examined using flow cytometry. Cancer cell proliferation in similar 3D conditions was also measured. Triple-negative breast cancer specimens were analyzed for the number of infiltrating CD8+ T cells and for the collagen density. Whole-transcriptome analyses were applied to investigate in detail the effects of collagen density on T cells. Computational analyses were used to identify transcription factors involved in the collagen density-induced gene regulation. Observed changes were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis.RESULTS: T cell proliferation was significantly reduced in a high-density matrix compared to a low-density matrix and prolonged culture in a high-density matrix led to a higher ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells. The proliferation of cancer cells was unaffected by the surrounding collagen-density. Consistently, we observed a reduction in the number of infiltrating CD8+ T-cells in mammary tumors with high collagen-density indicating that collagen-density has a role in regulating T cell abundance in human breast cancer. Whole-transcriptome analysis of 3D-cultured T cells revealed that a high-density matrix induces downregulation of cytotoxic activity markers and upregulation of regulatory T cell markers. These transcriptional changes were predicted to involve autocrine TGF-β signaling and they were accompanied by an impaired ability of tumor-infiltrating T cells to kill autologous cancer cells.CONCLUSIONS: Our study identifies a new immune modulatory mechanism, which could be essential for suppression of T cell activity in the tumor microenvironment.

AB - BACKGROUND: Tumor progression is accompanied by dramatic remodeling of the surrounding extracellular matrix leading to the formation of a tumor-specific ECM, which is often more collagen-rich and of increased stiffness. The altered ECM of the tumor supports cancer growth and metastasis, but it is unknown if this effect involves modulation of T cell activity. To investigate if a high-density tumor-specific ECM could influence the ability of T cells to kill cancer cells, we here studied how T cells respond to 3D culture in different collagen densities.METHODS: T cells cultured in 3D conditions surrounded by a high or low collagen density were imaged using confocal fluorescent microscopy. The effects of the different collagen densities on T cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation were examined using flow cytometry. Cancer cell proliferation in similar 3D conditions was also measured. Triple-negative breast cancer specimens were analyzed for the number of infiltrating CD8+ T cells and for the collagen density. Whole-transcriptome analyses were applied to investigate in detail the effects of collagen density on T cells. Computational analyses were used to identify transcription factors involved in the collagen density-induced gene regulation. Observed changes were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis.RESULTS: T cell proliferation was significantly reduced in a high-density matrix compared to a low-density matrix and prolonged culture in a high-density matrix led to a higher ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells. The proliferation of cancer cells was unaffected by the surrounding collagen-density. Consistently, we observed a reduction in the number of infiltrating CD8+ T-cells in mammary tumors with high collagen-density indicating that collagen-density has a role in regulating T cell abundance in human breast cancer. Whole-transcriptome analysis of 3D-cultured T cells revealed that a high-density matrix induces downregulation of cytotoxic activity markers and upregulation of regulatory T cell markers. These transcriptional changes were predicted to involve autocrine TGF-β signaling and they were accompanied by an impaired ability of tumor-infiltrating T cells to kill autologous cancer cells.CONCLUSIONS: Our study identifies a new immune modulatory mechanism, which could be essential for suppression of T cell activity in the tumor microenvironment.

U2 - 10.1186/s40425-019-0556-6

DO - 10.1186/s40425-019-0556-6

M3 - Journal article

VL - 7

SP - 68

JO - Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer

JF - Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer

SN - 2051-1426

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 57730292