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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Co-designing an Intervention for Adults with New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes to Improve Psychological and Social Adaptation

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Adults newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) can experience significant psychosocial disruption, leading to maladaptive emotional and behavioral responses which may increase the risk of future complications.
The aim of the study was to co-design an intervention with people with diabetes (PWD) and healthcare-professionals (HCPs) to address the psychosocial disruption associated with new onset T1D in adults.
We used a co-design approach to stimulate the target populations to reflect on their experiences and generate ideas for the intervention. This involved the use of illustrations depicting common experiences of the time of diagnosis identified in a previous study among PWD and HCPs. Illustrations were used as conversation tools in six parallel workshops exclusively for PWD (n=24) and HCPs (n=55); and four workshops that brought PWD (n=31) and HCPs (n=19) together to prioritize intervention components. Data comprising of transcribed audio recordings and notes from participants were analyzed thematically with a view to intervention development.
The workshops identified that the intervention should be phasic, with an initial focus on the psychosocial disruption of diagnosis, followed by the early experience of diabetes and how to adapt positively to a life with it. Participants constructed two integrated intervention components: 1) one-to-one sessions soon after diagnosis, with a HCP trained in using a psychologically modelled conversation tool addressing PWD’s experiences, thoughts and feelings about the diagnosis; and 2) a group-based intervention addressing common diabetes challenges, emotional issues and thinking traps, focusing on normalizing emotions and developing strategies for managing diabetes in day-to-day life.
The co-design process revealed the benefit of adopting a bio-psycho-social perspective and introducing methods of support involving both HCPs and peers to activate positive adaptive strategies in adults with new onset T1D.
Original languageEnglish
Article number16-OR
JournalDiabetes
Volume69
Issue numberS1
ISSN0046-0192
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Jun 2020
EventAmerican Diabetes Association 80th Virtual Scientific Sessions -
Duration: 12 Jun 202016 Jun 2020

Conference

ConferenceAmerican Diabetes Association 80th Virtual Scientific Sessions
Period12/06/202016/06/2020

Event

American Diabetes Association 80th Virtual Scientific Sessions

12/06/202016/06/2020

Event: Conference

ID: 61455481