Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Clinical Effects of a Pharmacist Intervention in Acute Wards - A Randomized Controlled Trial

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Drug-related challenges following primary total hip and knee arthroplasty

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Validation of registration of pharmacological treatment in the Danish Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registers

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Camostat mesylate against SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19-Rationale, dosing and safety

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  4. Postponement of cardiovascular outcomes by statin use: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Maternal thyroid disease and adiposity in mother and child

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Perioperative Alcohol and Smoking Cessation Intervention: Impact on Other Lifestyles

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

The purpose of the study was to investigate the clinical effect of a clinical pharmacist (CP) intervention upon admission to hospital on inpatient harm and to assess a potential educational bias. Over 16 months, 593 adult patients taking ≥4 medications daily were included from three Danish acute medicine wards. Patients were randomized to either the CP intervention or the usual care (prospective control). To assess a potential educational bias, a retrospective control group was formed by randomization. The CP intervention comprised medication history, medication reconciliation, medication review and entry of proposed prescriptions into the electronic prescribing system. The primary outcome of inpatient harm was identified using triggers from the Institute of Healthcare Improvement Global Trigger Tool. Harms were validated and rated for severity by two independent and blinded outcome panels. Secondary end-points were harms per patient, length of hospital stay, readmissions and 1-year mortality. Harm affected 11% of the patients in the intervention group compared to 17% in the combined control group, odds ratio (OR) 0.57 (CI 0.32-1.02, p = 0.06). The incidence of harm was similar in the intervention and prospective control groups, OR 0.80 (CI 0.40-1.59, p = 0.52) but occurred less frequently in the intervention than in the retrospective control group OR 0.46 (CI 0.25-0.85, p = 0.01). An educational bias from the intervention to the control group might have contributed to this negative outcome. In conclusion, the CP intervention at admission to hospital had no statistically significant effect on inpatient harm.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBasic & clinical pharmacology & toxicology
Volume121
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)325-333
Number of pages9
ISSN1742-7843
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

    Research areas

  • Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Denmark, Drug Interactions, Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/etiology, Electronic Prescribing, Female, Humans, Inpatients, Length of Stay, Male, Medication Errors/prevention & control, Medication Reconciliation, Medication Systems, Hospital, Medication Therapy Management, Middle Aged, Patient Admission, Patient Safety, Pharmacists, Pharmacy Service, Hospital, Polypharmacy, Prospective Studies, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome

ID: 56668739