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Circulating Metabolites and Lipids Are Associated to Diabetic Retinopathy in Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes

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@article{d2982070092342ab95841ddd62067928,
title = "Circulating Metabolites and Lipids Are Associated to Diabetic Retinopathy in Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes",
abstract = "Omics-based methods may provide new markers associated to diabetic retinopathy (DR). We investigated a wide omics panel of metabolites and lipids related to DR in type 1 diabetes. Metabolomic analyses were performed using two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry and lipidomic analyses using an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry method in 648 individuals with type 1 diabetes. Subjects were subdivided into no DR, mild nonproliferative DR (NPDR), moderate NPDR, proliferative DR, and proliferative DR with fibrosis. End points were any progression of DR, onset of DR, and progression from mild to severe DR tracked from standard ambulatory care and investigated using Cox models. The cohort consisted of 648 participants aged a mean of 54.4 ± 12.8 years, 55.5% were men, and follow-up was 5.1-5.5 years. Cross-sectionally, 2,4-dihydroxybutyric acid (DHBA), 3,4-DHBA, ribonic acid, ribitol, and the triglycerides 50:1 and 50:2 significantly correlated (P < 0.042) to DR stage. Longitudinally, higher 3,4-DHBA was a risk marker for progression of DR (n = 133) after adjustment (P = 0.033). We demonstrated multiple metabolites being positively correlated to a higher grade of DR in type 1 diabetes and several triglycerides being negatively correlated. Furthermore, higher 3,4-DHBA was an independent risk marker for progression of DR; however, confirmation is required.",
author = "Curovic, {Viktor Rotbain} and Tommi Suvitaival and Ismo Mattila and Linda Ahonen and Kajetan Tro{\v s}t and Simone Theilade and Hansen, {Tine W} and Cristina Legido-Quigley and Peter Rossing",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 by the American Diabetes Association.",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
doi = "10.2337/db20-0104",
language = "English",
volume = "69",
pages = "2217--2226",
journal = "Diabetes",
issn = "0012-1797",
publisher = "American Diabetes Association",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Circulating Metabolites and Lipids Are Associated to Diabetic Retinopathy in Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes

AU - Curovic, Viktor Rotbain

AU - Suvitaival, Tommi

AU - Mattila, Ismo

AU - Ahonen, Linda

AU - Trošt, Kajetan

AU - Theilade, Simone

AU - Hansen, Tine W

AU - Legido-Quigley, Cristina

AU - Rossing, Peter

N1 - © 2020 by the American Diabetes Association.

PY - 2020/10

Y1 - 2020/10

N2 - Omics-based methods may provide new markers associated to diabetic retinopathy (DR). We investigated a wide omics panel of metabolites and lipids related to DR in type 1 diabetes. Metabolomic analyses were performed using two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry and lipidomic analyses using an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry method in 648 individuals with type 1 diabetes. Subjects were subdivided into no DR, mild nonproliferative DR (NPDR), moderate NPDR, proliferative DR, and proliferative DR with fibrosis. End points were any progression of DR, onset of DR, and progression from mild to severe DR tracked from standard ambulatory care and investigated using Cox models. The cohort consisted of 648 participants aged a mean of 54.4 ± 12.8 years, 55.5% were men, and follow-up was 5.1-5.5 years. Cross-sectionally, 2,4-dihydroxybutyric acid (DHBA), 3,4-DHBA, ribonic acid, ribitol, and the triglycerides 50:1 and 50:2 significantly correlated (P < 0.042) to DR stage. Longitudinally, higher 3,4-DHBA was a risk marker for progression of DR (n = 133) after adjustment (P = 0.033). We demonstrated multiple metabolites being positively correlated to a higher grade of DR in type 1 diabetes and several triglycerides being negatively correlated. Furthermore, higher 3,4-DHBA was an independent risk marker for progression of DR; however, confirmation is required.

AB - Omics-based methods may provide new markers associated to diabetic retinopathy (DR). We investigated a wide omics panel of metabolites and lipids related to DR in type 1 diabetes. Metabolomic analyses were performed using two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry and lipidomic analyses using an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry method in 648 individuals with type 1 diabetes. Subjects were subdivided into no DR, mild nonproliferative DR (NPDR), moderate NPDR, proliferative DR, and proliferative DR with fibrosis. End points were any progression of DR, onset of DR, and progression from mild to severe DR tracked from standard ambulatory care and investigated using Cox models. The cohort consisted of 648 participants aged a mean of 54.4 ± 12.8 years, 55.5% were men, and follow-up was 5.1-5.5 years. Cross-sectionally, 2,4-dihydroxybutyric acid (DHBA), 3,4-DHBA, ribonic acid, ribitol, and the triglycerides 50:1 and 50:2 significantly correlated (P < 0.042) to DR stage. Longitudinally, higher 3,4-DHBA was a risk marker for progression of DR (n = 133) after adjustment (P = 0.033). We demonstrated multiple metabolites being positively correlated to a higher grade of DR in type 1 diabetes and several triglycerides being negatively correlated. Furthermore, higher 3,4-DHBA was an independent risk marker for progression of DR; however, confirmation is required.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85091469634&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2337/db20-0104

DO - 10.2337/db20-0104

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32737117

VL - 69

SP - 2217

EP - 2226

JO - Diabetes

JF - Diabetes

SN - 0012-1797

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 60929162