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Chronic pain after reoperation of an inguinal hernia with Lichtenstein or laparoscopic repair following a primary Lichtenstein repair: A nationwide questionnaire study

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@article{aebe86c7bc7f4b339458d85253551791,
title = "Chronic pain after reoperation of an inguinal hernia with Lichtenstein or laparoscopic repair following a primary Lichtenstein repair: A nationwide questionnaire study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The aim was to assess chronic pain after two Lichtenstein repairs for inguinal hernias (Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein) compared with Lichtenstein followed by a laparoscopic reoperation (Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy).METHODS: In this cohort study, adults having an inguinal hernia reoperation were identified in a nationwide database. Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein was matched 1:3 with Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy and sent validated pain questionnaires. The primary outcome was difference in proportion of patients with chronic pain-related functional impairment. Secondary outcomes were differences in chronic pain prevalence and severity.RESULTS: In total, 196 patients having Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein and 777 patients having Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy were included. There was no difference in the primary outcome, 26{\%} with pain in Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein versus 19{\%} in Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy (p = 0.051). However, a few of the secondary outcomes favored Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy.CONCLUSIONS: A high proportion of patients in both groups had pain several years after the second repair. None of the analyses favored Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein, but a few of the secondary outcomes favored Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy.",
keywords = "Aged, Chronic Pain/etiology, Cohort Studies, Female, Hernia, Inguinal/surgery, Herniorrhaphy/adverse effects, Humans, Laparoscopy/adverse effects, Male, Postoperative Complications, Prevalence, Reoperation, Surveys and Questionnaires, Visual Analog Scale",
author = "Stina {\"O}berg and Kristoffer Andresen and Baker, {Jason J} and Eva Angenete and Jacob Rosenberg",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjsurg.2019.04.015",
language = "English",
volume = "219",
pages = "701--706",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0002-9610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic pain after reoperation of an inguinal hernia with Lichtenstein or laparoscopic repair following a primary Lichtenstein repair

T2 - A nationwide questionnaire study

AU - Öberg, Stina

AU - Andresen, Kristoffer

AU - Baker, Jason J

AU - Angenete, Eva

AU - Rosenberg, Jacob

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/4

Y1 - 2020/4

N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim was to assess chronic pain after two Lichtenstein repairs for inguinal hernias (Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein) compared with Lichtenstein followed by a laparoscopic reoperation (Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy).METHODS: In this cohort study, adults having an inguinal hernia reoperation were identified in a nationwide database. Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein was matched 1:3 with Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy and sent validated pain questionnaires. The primary outcome was difference in proportion of patients with chronic pain-related functional impairment. Secondary outcomes were differences in chronic pain prevalence and severity.RESULTS: In total, 196 patients having Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein and 777 patients having Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy were included. There was no difference in the primary outcome, 26% with pain in Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein versus 19% in Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy (p = 0.051). However, a few of the secondary outcomes favored Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy.CONCLUSIONS: A high proportion of patients in both groups had pain several years after the second repair. None of the analyses favored Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein, but a few of the secondary outcomes favored Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy.

AB - BACKGROUND: The aim was to assess chronic pain after two Lichtenstein repairs for inguinal hernias (Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein) compared with Lichtenstein followed by a laparoscopic reoperation (Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy).METHODS: In this cohort study, adults having an inguinal hernia reoperation were identified in a nationwide database. Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein was matched 1:3 with Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy and sent validated pain questionnaires. The primary outcome was difference in proportion of patients with chronic pain-related functional impairment. Secondary outcomes were differences in chronic pain prevalence and severity.RESULTS: In total, 196 patients having Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein and 777 patients having Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy were included. There was no difference in the primary outcome, 26% with pain in Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein versus 19% in Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy (p = 0.051). However, a few of the secondary outcomes favored Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy.CONCLUSIONS: A high proportion of patients in both groups had pain several years after the second repair. None of the analyses favored Lichtenstein-Lichtenstein, but a few of the secondary outcomes favored Lichtenstein-Laparoscopy.

KW - Aged

KW - Chronic Pain/etiology

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Female

KW - Hernia, Inguinal/surgery

KW - Herniorrhaphy/adverse effects

KW - Humans

KW - Laparoscopy/adverse effects

KW - Male

KW - Postoperative Complications

KW - Prevalence

KW - Reoperation

KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

KW - Visual Analog Scale

U2 - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2019.04.015

DO - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2019.04.015

M3 - Journal article

VL - 219

SP - 701

EP - 706

JO - American Journal of Surgery

JF - American Journal of Surgery

SN - 0002-9610

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 60987136