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Characteristics, management and outcomes of very preterm triplets in 19 European regions

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OBJECTIVE: To describe obstetrical care and in-hospital outcomes in very preterm triplet pregnancies in a European multiregional cohort.

METHODS: Data from a prospective population-based study of very preterm births between 22+0 and 31+6 weeks of gestation in 19 regions from 11 European countries participating in the EPICE project in 2011/2012 were used to describe triplet pregnancies and compare them with twins and singletons.

RESULTS: Triplets constituted 1.1% of very preterm pregnancies (97/8851) and 3.3% of very preterm live births (258/7900); these percentages varied from 0% to 2.6% and 0% to 6% respectively across the regions. In-hospital mortality after live birth was 12.4% and did not differ significantly from singletons or twins or by birth order. However, 28.9% of mothers with a triplet pregnancy experienced at least one neonatal death. Ninety percent of live-born triplets were delivered by cesarean. Vaginal delivery was associated with an Apgar score of less than 7, but not with in-hospital mortality.

CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of very preterm triplets varies across European regions. Most triplets were born by cesarean and those born vaginally had lower Apgar scores. Overall, in-hospital mortality after live birth was similar to singletons and twins. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
Volume147
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)397-403
Number of pages7
ISSN0020-7292
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Bibliographical note

© 2019 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

    Research areas

  • Cesarean section, Fetal growth restriction, In-hospital mortality, Neonatal morbidity, Stillbirth, Triplets, Very preterm birth

ID: 57796393