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Change in mammographic density across birth cohorts of Dutch breast cancer screening participants

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Harvard

Napolitano, G, Lynge, E, Lillholm, M, Vejborg, I, van Gils, CH, Nielsen, M & Karssemeijer, N 2019, 'Change in mammographic density across birth cohorts of Dutch breast cancer screening participants' International Journal of Cancer, vol. 145, no. 11, pp. 2954-2962. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32210

APA

Napolitano, G., Lynge, E., Lillholm, M., Vejborg, I., van Gils, C. H., Nielsen, M., & Karssemeijer, N. (2019). Change in mammographic density across birth cohorts of Dutch breast cancer screening participants. International Journal of Cancer, 145(11), 2954-2962. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32210

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Napolitano, George ; Lynge, Elsebeth ; Lillholm, Martin ; Vejborg, Ilse ; van Gils, Carla H ; Nielsen, Mads ; Karssemeijer, Nico. / Change in mammographic density across birth cohorts of Dutch breast cancer screening participants. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2019 ; Vol. 145, No. 11. pp. 2954-2962.

Bibtex

@article{d7f1190798d24e04aa107ed01b5b5ded,
title = "Change in mammographic density across birth cohorts of Dutch breast cancer screening participants",
abstract = "High mammographic density is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer. This study aimed to search for a possible birth cohort effect on mammographic density, which might contribute to explain the increasing breast cancer incidence. We separately analyzed left and right breast density of Dutch women from a 13-year period (2003-2016) in the breast cancer screening programme. First, we analyzed age-specific changes in average percent dense volume (PDV) across birth cohorts. A linear regression analysis (PDV vs. year of birth) indicated a small but statistically significant increase in women of: 1) age 50 and born from 1952 to 1966 (left, slope = 0.04, p = 0.003; right, slope = 0.09, p < 0.0001); 2) age 55 and born from 1948 to 1961 (right, slope = 0.04, p = 0.01); and 3) age 70 and born from 1933 to 1946 (right, slope = 0.05, p = 0.002). A decrease of total breast volume seemed to explain the increase in PDV. Second, we compared proportion of women with dense breast in women born in 1946-1953 and 1959-1966, and observed a statistical significant increase of proportion of highly dense breast in later born women, in the 51 to 55 age-groups for the left breast (around a 20{\%} increase in each age-group), and in the 50 to 56 age-groups for the right breast (increase ranging from 27{\%} to 48{\%}). The study indicated a slight increase in mammography density across birth cohorts, most pronounced for women in their early 50s, and more marked for the right than for the left breast.",
author = "George Napolitano and Elsebeth Lynge and Martin Lillholm and Ilse Vejborg and {van Gils}, {Carla H} and Mads Nielsen and Nico Karssemeijer",
note = "{\circledC} 2019 The Authors. International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/ijc.32210",
language = "English",
volume = "145",
pages = "2954--2962",
journal = "International Journal of Cancer",
issn = "0020-7136",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Change in mammographic density across birth cohorts of Dutch breast cancer screening participants

AU - Napolitano, George

AU - Lynge, Elsebeth

AU - Lillholm, Martin

AU - Vejborg, Ilse

AU - van Gils, Carla H

AU - Nielsen, Mads

AU - Karssemeijer, Nico

N1 - © 2019 The Authors. International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - High mammographic density is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer. This study aimed to search for a possible birth cohort effect on mammographic density, which might contribute to explain the increasing breast cancer incidence. We separately analyzed left and right breast density of Dutch women from a 13-year period (2003-2016) in the breast cancer screening programme. First, we analyzed age-specific changes in average percent dense volume (PDV) across birth cohorts. A linear regression analysis (PDV vs. year of birth) indicated a small but statistically significant increase in women of: 1) age 50 and born from 1952 to 1966 (left, slope = 0.04, p = 0.003; right, slope = 0.09, p < 0.0001); 2) age 55 and born from 1948 to 1961 (right, slope = 0.04, p = 0.01); and 3) age 70 and born from 1933 to 1946 (right, slope = 0.05, p = 0.002). A decrease of total breast volume seemed to explain the increase in PDV. Second, we compared proportion of women with dense breast in women born in 1946-1953 and 1959-1966, and observed a statistical significant increase of proportion of highly dense breast in later born women, in the 51 to 55 age-groups for the left breast (around a 20% increase in each age-group), and in the 50 to 56 age-groups for the right breast (increase ranging from 27% to 48%). The study indicated a slight increase in mammography density across birth cohorts, most pronounced for women in their early 50s, and more marked for the right than for the left breast.

AB - High mammographic density is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer. This study aimed to search for a possible birth cohort effect on mammographic density, which might contribute to explain the increasing breast cancer incidence. We separately analyzed left and right breast density of Dutch women from a 13-year period (2003-2016) in the breast cancer screening programme. First, we analyzed age-specific changes in average percent dense volume (PDV) across birth cohorts. A linear regression analysis (PDV vs. year of birth) indicated a small but statistically significant increase in women of: 1) age 50 and born from 1952 to 1966 (left, slope = 0.04, p = 0.003; right, slope = 0.09, p < 0.0001); 2) age 55 and born from 1948 to 1961 (right, slope = 0.04, p = 0.01); and 3) age 70 and born from 1933 to 1946 (right, slope = 0.05, p = 0.002). A decrease of total breast volume seemed to explain the increase in PDV. Second, we compared proportion of women with dense breast in women born in 1946-1953 and 1959-1966, and observed a statistical significant increase of proportion of highly dense breast in later born women, in the 51 to 55 age-groups for the left breast (around a 20% increase in each age-group), and in the 50 to 56 age-groups for the right breast (increase ranging from 27% to 48%). The study indicated a slight increase in mammography density across birth cohorts, most pronounced for women in their early 50s, and more marked for the right than for the left breast.

U2 - 10.1002/ijc.32210

DO - 10.1002/ijc.32210

M3 - Journal article

VL - 145

SP - 2954

EP - 2962

JO - International Journal of Cancer

JF - International Journal of Cancer

SN - 0020-7136

IS - 11

ER -

ID: 58436058