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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Change in HbA1c concentration as decision parameter for frequency of HbA1c measurement

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Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a long-term measure for glucose concentration in plasma. Since its introduction as a diabetes monitoring tool, and its more recent application as a diagnostic tool, the number of measurements of HbA1c have risen dramatically. However, HbA1c change is slow, so repeating measurements should not be done too often. We use a large, unfiltered dataset from 52,017 patients to determine the possible rate of change in HbA1c concentration. In our laboratory, the critical difference between HbA1c measurements is 8.5%. Our data show that a 1-unit HbA1c rise takes 4 weeks to occur, hence, at a HbA1c concentration around 50 mmol/mol Hgb, a critically increased HbA1c concentration cannot be determined until after 16 weeks. Conversely a critically lower HbA1c can manifest itself after 2 weeks, but after 7 weeks the dropping tendency stops. The amount of measurements that can be cancelled because they were taken sooner than 16 weeks is 23 percent.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation
Volume79
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)320-324
Number of pages5
ISSN0036-5513
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

    Research areas

  • clinical chemistry tests, clinical laboratory information systems, economics, Glycated Hemoglobin A, medical

ID: 57307501