Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Cerebral vs. Cardiovascular Responses to Exercise in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. A glucose-insulin-glucagon coupled model of the isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion experiment

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. An Estimate of Plasma Volume Changes Following Moderate-High Intensity Running and Cycling Exercise and Adrenaline Infusion

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. A Vasopressin-Induced Change in Prostaglandin Receptor Subtype Expression Explains the Differential Effect of PGE2 on AQP2 Expression

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Hepcidin and Erythroferrone Complement the Athlete Biological Passport in the Detection of Autologous Blood Transfusion

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Effect of adrenaline on serum mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and central blood volume

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Impact of Polymorphism in the β2-Receptor Gene on Metabolic Responses to Repeated Hypoglycemia in Healthy Humans

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. The role of lactate in sepsis and COVID-19: Perspective from contracting skeletal muscle metabolism

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  • Yu-Sok Kim
  • Björn J P van der Ster
  • Patrice Brassard
  • Niels H Secher
  • Johannes J van Lieshout
View graph of relations

The human brain is constantly active and even small limitations to cerebral blood flow (CBF) may be critical for preserving oxygen and substrate supply, e.g., during exercise and hypoxia. Exhaustive exercise evokes a competition for the supply of oxygenated blood between the brain and the working muscles, and inability to increase cardiac output sufficiently during exercise may jeopardize cerebral perfusion of relevance for diabetic patients. The challenge in diabetes care is to optimize metabolic control to slow progression of vascular disease, but likely because of a limited ability to increase cardiac output, these patients perceive aerobic exercise to be more strenuous than healthy subjects and that limits the possibility to apply physical activity as a preventive lifestyle intervention. In this review, we consider the effects of functional activation by exercise on the brain and how it contributes to understanding the control of CBF with the limited exercise tolerance experienced by type 2 diabetic patients. Whether a decline in cerebral oxygenation and thereby reduced neural drive to working muscles plays a role for "central" fatigue during exhaustive exercise is addressed in relation to brain's attenuated vascular response to exercise in type 2 diabetic subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number583155
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume11
Pages (from-to)583155
ISSN1664-042X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2021

    Research areas

  • cardiac output, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolism, cerebral oxygenation, diabetes, vascular conductance

ID: 62407882