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Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans

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Enteropancreatic hormone secretion is thought to include a cephalic phase, but the evidence in humans is ambiguous. We studied vagally induced gut hormone responses with and without muscarinic blockade in 10 glucose-clamped healthy men (age: 24.5 ± 0.6 yr, means ± SE; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.5 kg/m(2); HbA1c: 5.1 ± 0.1%/31.4 ± 0.5 mmol/mol). Cephalic activation was elicited by modified sham feeding (MSF, aka "chew and spit") with or without atropine (1 mg bolus 45 min before MSF + 80 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 2 h). To mimic incipient prandial glucose excursions, glucose levels were clamped at 6 mmol/l on all days. The meal stimulus for the MSF consisted of an appetizing breakfast. Participants (9/10) also had a 6 mmol/l glucose clamp without MSF. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) levels rose from 6.3 ± 1.1 to 19.9 ± 6.8 pmol/l (means ± SE) in response to MSF and atropine lowered basal PP levels and abolished the MSF response. Neither insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), nor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels changed in response to MSF or atropine. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were markedly attenuated by atropine prior to and during the clamp: at t = 105 min on the atropine (ATR) + clamp (CLA) + MSF compared with the saline (SAL) + CLA and SAL + CLA + MSF days; baseline-subtracted glucagon levels were -10.7 ± 1.1 vs. -4.0 ± 1.1 and -4.7 ± 1.9 pmol/l (means ± SE), P < 0.0001, respectively; corresponding baseline-subtracted ghrelin levels were 303 ± 36 vs. 39 ± 38 and 3.7 ± 21 pg/ml (means ± SE), P < 0.0001. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were unaffected by MSF. Despite adequate PP responses, a cephalic phase response was absent for insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, and ghrelin.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume310
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)G43-51
ISSN0193-1857
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

    Research areas

  • Adult, Biomarkers, Blood Glucose, Denmark, Eating, Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide, Ghrelin, Glucagon, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucose Clamp Technique, Heart Rate, Humans, Insulin, Intestinal Secretions, Intestines, Male, Muscarinic Antagonists, Pancreas, Pancreatic Polypeptide, Postprandial Period, Time Factors, Vagus Nerve, Young Adult, Clinical Trial, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

ID: 49290594