Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Cellular uptake of collagens and implications for immune cell regulation in disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Disorder in a two-domain neuronal Ca2+-binding protein regulates domain stability and dynamics using ligand mimicry

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. The PCNA interaction motifs revisited: thinking outside the PIP-box

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Investigating the aetiology of adverse events following HPV vaccination with systems vaccinology

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  4. TSC1 and TSC2 regulate cilia length and canonical Hedgehog signaling via different mechanisms

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Personalized B cell response to the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG probiotic in healthy human subjects: a randomized trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Tumor cell MT1-MMP is dispensable for osteosarcoma tumor growth, bone degradation and lung metastasis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Granzyme B Degraded Type IV Collagen Products in Serum Identify Melanoma Patients Responding to Immune Checkpoint Blockade

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Collagen Density Modulates the Immunosuppressive Functions of Macrophages

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 regulates collectins through unique structural elements in its FNII domain

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

As the dominant constituent of the extracellular matrix (ECM), collagens of different types are critical for the structural properties of tissues and make up scaffolds for cellular adhesion and migration. Importantly, collagens also directly modulate the phenotypic state of cells by transmitting signals that influence proliferation, differentiation, polarization, survival, and more, to cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, or endothelial origin. Recently, the potential of collagens to provide immune regulatory signals has also been demonstrated, and it is believed that pathological changes in the ECM shape immune cell phenotype. Collagens are themselves heavily regulated by a multitude of structural modulations or by catabolic pathways. One of these pathways involves a cellular uptake of collagens or soluble collagen-like defense collagens of the innate immune system mediated by endocytic collagen receptors. This cellular uptake is followed by the degradation of collagens in lysosomes. The potential of this pathway to regulate collagens in pathological conditions is evident from the increased extracellular accumulation of both collagens and collagen-like defense collagens following endocytic collagen receptor ablation. Here, we review how endocytic collagen receptors regulate collagen turnover during physiological conditions and in pathological conditions, such as fibrosis and cancer. Furthermore, we highlight the potential of collagens to regulate immune cells and discuss how endocytic collagen receptors can directly regulate immune cell activity in pathological conditions or do it indirectly by altering the extracellular milieu. Finally, we discuss the potential collagen receptors utilized by immune cells to directly detect ECM-related changes in the tissues which they encounter.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS
Volume77
Issue number16
Pages (from-to)3161-3176
Number of pages16
ISSN1420-682X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Feb 2020

    Research areas

  • Animals, Collagen/immunology, Endocytosis/immunology, Extracellular Matrix/immunology, Fibrosis/immunology, Humans, Neoplasms/immunology

ID: 60626811