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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome as Sentinel for Harmful Hand Activities at Work: A Nationwide Danish Cohort Study

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OBJECTIVE: Evaluate incidence rates (IRs) of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) as sentinels to identify job groups with high hand-wrist exposures.

METHODS: A nationwide register-based cohort study of all born in Denmark. During follow-up 2010 to 2013, we identified first-time CTS diagnoses. We established job groups, calculated sex-specific age-standardized IRs (SIRs) per job group. We linked occupational codes with a job exposure matrix, calculated mean hand load estimate per job group, and plotted hand load against the SIRs.

RESULTS: We followed 1,171,580 men and 1,137,854 women for 4,046,851 and 3,994,987 person-years; identified 4405 cases among men, 7858 among women; obtained crude IRs of 10.9 and 19.7 per 10,000 person-years. For both sexes, there was a positive association between SIRs and hand load.

CONCLUSIONS: Higher SIRs pointed to job groups with higher hand load. Elevated SIRs of CTS may serve as sentinels of harmful hand activities.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume62
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)375-382
Number of pages8
ISSN1076-2752
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2020

    Research areas

  • Diabetes, epidemiological surveillance, hand load, job exposure matrix, occupational exposures, register study, upper extremity

ID: 61531636