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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Can experimental data in humans verify the finite element-based bone remodeling algorithm?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Modic Changes Are Not Associated With Long-term Pain and Disability: A Cohort Study With 13-year Follow-up

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. External Validation of the Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Frailty Index (ASD-FI) in the Scoli-RISK-1 Patient Database

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Characterization and Predictive Value of Segmental Curve Flexibility in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Radiographic Predictors for Mechanical Failure After Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery: A Retrospective Cohort Study in 138 Patients

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Evaluation of a new sagittal classification system in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Use of Opioids and Other Analgesics Before and After Primary Surgery for Adult Spinal Deformity: A 10-Year Nationwide Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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A finite element analysis-based bone remodeling study in human was conducted in the lumbar spine operated on with pedicle screws. Bone remodeling results were compared to prospective experimental bone mineral content data of patients operated on with pedicle screws.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSpine
Volume33
Issue number26
Pages (from-to)2875-80
Number of pages6
ISSN0362-2436
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Research areas

  • Adult, Algorithms, Bone Remodeling, Finite Element Analysis, Humans, Lumbar Vertebrae, Middle Aged, Reproducibility of Results, Research Design

ID: 34801855