Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) and Cluster Headache

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Standardization of Data for Clinical Use and Research in Spinal Cord Injury

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Hyperpolarization through ATP-sensitive potassium channels; relevance to migraine pathology

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  2. CGRP in rat mesenteric artery and vein - receptor expression, CGRP presence and potential roles

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Fluorescent Analogues of Human α-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide with Potent Vasodilator Activity

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. The distribution of oxytocin and the oxytocin receptor in rat brain: relation to regions active in migraine

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Cluster headache (CH) is a severe primary headache with a prevalence of 1/1000 individuals, and a predominance in men. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator, originating in trigeminal neurons and has a central role in CH pathophysiology. CGRP and the CGRP receptor complex have recently taken center stage as therapeutic targets for primary headaches, such as migraine. Multiple CGRP and CGRP receptor monoclonal antibodies, as well as small molecule antagonists (gepants) are on their way constituting a new frontier of migraine and possibly CH medication. During a CH attack, there is an activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex with the release of CGRP, and inversely if CGRP is administered to a CH patient in an active disease phase, it triggers an attack. Increased levels of CGRP have been found in ipsilateral jugular vein blood during the active phase of CH. This process is hypothesized to have a key role in the intense pain perception and in the associated distinctive vasodilation. So far, clinical tests of CGRP antibodies have been inconclusive in CH patients. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the role of CGRP in CH pathology, and as a target for future treatments.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume10
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)30
Number of pages16
ISSN2076-3425
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jan 2020

ID: 59203380