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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Burnout in physicians: a survey of the Danish society for palliative medicine

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OBJECTIVES: Burnout, which is a state of prolonged physical and psychological exhaustion, seems to be a prevalent and serious problem among healthcare workers. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of burnout symptoms among members of Danish Society of Palliative Medicine (DSPaM).

METHODS: All 160 physician members of DSPaM were invited to a questionnaire survey. The Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI) was used to evaluate and differentiate between personal, work-related and client-related burnout.

RESULTS: 76 members responded (47,5%). 51% regularly received supervision. Scores on personal burnout demonstrated that 25% had no symptoms and 55% had symptoms that required attention; however, no respondents needed immediate intervention. Regarding work-related burnout: 40% had no symptoms, 20% had symptoms that needed attention and 3% needed immediate help. Regarding client-related burnout: 65% had no symptoms, 32% had symptoms that needed attention and none needed immediate intervention.

CONCLUSIONS: This survey demonstrated a relatively low rate of burnout symptoms among members of the DSPaM. In particular, the client-related burnout score was low, while higher scores were observed in personal and work-related burnout. Despite the relatively low overall levels of burnout, it is notable that about half of the physicians reported personal burnout, which needs to be addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere003237
JournalBMJ Supportive and Palliative Care
ISSN2045-435X
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Jun 2021

    Research areas

  • communication, education and training, supportive care, terminal care

ID: 67449437