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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Body mass index in young men and risk of inflammatory bowel disease through adult life: A population-based Danish cohort study

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Body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased future risk of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) particularly Crohn's disease(CD), where associations with high and low BMI have been observed. Most studies are based on adult women. We aimed to explore the impact of BMI in men entering adult life on their long-term risk of developing IBD. A total of 377,957 men born during 1939-1959, with BMI measured at draft boards at mean age 19, were followed from 1977, or time of examination, to end of 2015. Risk of IBD was assessed using Cox regression. During 13 million person-years of follow-up, 1,523 developed CD and 3,323 UC. Using normal weight as reference, for CD the following HRs were observed: BMI < 18.5, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.12-1.62, BMI 25-29.9; 0.83; 95% CI, 0.68-1.02. and BMI > 30 1.20; 95% CI, 0.75-1.90). The increased risk of CD in underweight was maintained up until age 60 not explained by known effects of smoking. For UC, minor inverse associations were observed. Restricted cubic splines revealed a U-shape association between BMI and CD, but not UC. Low BMI of men entering adult life is associated with an increased incidence of CD and UC up to 40 years later.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6360
JournalScientific Reports
Volume9
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)6360
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

ID: 57059196