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Body iron is a contributor to oxidative damage of DNA

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  1. Progressive DNA and RNA damage from oxidation after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in humans

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  2. Urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation in Danish overweight/obese children and youths

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  3. Assays for urinary biomarkers of oxidatively damaged nucleic acids

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  4. The association between low-grade inflammation, iron status and nucleic acid oxidation in the elderly

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  1. Polygenic predisposition to breast cancer and the risk of coronary artery disease

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  2. Clinical, Physiologic, and Behavioral Evaluation of Permanently Catheterized NMRI Mice

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  3. A multisystem composite biomarker as a preliminary diagnostic test in bipolar disorder

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  4. The efficacy of adjunctive N-acetylcysteine in acute bipolar depression: A randomized placebo-controlled study

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  • Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
  • Steffen Loft
  • Kristiina Nyyssönen
  • Kari Punnonen
  • Jukka T Salonen
  • Henrik E Poulsen
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The transition metal iron is catalytically highly active in vitro, and not surprisingly, body iron has been suggested to promote oxidative stress in vivo. In the current analysis we studied the association of serum ferritin concentration and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration with daily urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine excretion, a marker of oxidative stress, in 48 mildly dyslipidemic men in East Finland. In multivariate linear regression analyses allowing for age, smoking, body mass index and physical exercise, serum ferritin concentration predicted the excretion rate at B = 0.17 (95% CI 0.08-0.26, P = 0.001), and serum soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin concentration ratio (TfR/ferritin) predicted the excretion rate at B = - 0.13 (95% CI - 0.21 to - 0.05, P = 0.002). Our data suggest that body iron contributes to excess oxidative stress already at non-iron overload concentrations in these subjects.
Original languageEnglish
JournalFree Radical Research
Volume41
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)324-8
Number of pages5
ISSN1071-5762
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

    Research areas

  • Body Composition, DNA, DNA Damage, Deoxyguanosine, Female, Ferritins, Humans, Hypercholesterolemia, Iron, Male, Middle Aged, Oxidative Stress, Receptors, Transferrin, Tissue Distribution

ID: 34910890