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Beginnings: a reflection on the history of gastrointestinal endocrinology

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  1. Gene expression profiling of gastric mucosa in mice lacking CCK and gastrin receptors

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  2. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

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  3. Adropin: a new regulatory peptide in cardiovascular endocrinology

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  4. Cardiac C-type natriuretic peptide gene expression and plasma concentrations in neonatal piglets

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  5. Gut hormones - Team workers or solo trippers?

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  1. Oral D/L-3-Hydroxybutyrate stimulates cholecystokinin and insulin secretion and slows gastric emptying in healthy males

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  2. Bilio-enteric flow and plasma concentrations of bile acids after gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy

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  3. Circadian variations in plasma concentrations of cholecystokinin and gastrin in man

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  4. Increased oral sodium chloride intake in humans amplifies selectively postprandial GLP-1 but not GIP, CCK, and gastrin in plasma

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The gut is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones share some characteristics: Their structure groups hormones into families, each of which originate from a single gene. A hormone gene is often expressed in multiple peptides due to tandem genes, alternative splicing or differentiated posttranslational processing. By these mechanisms, more than 100 different hormonally active peptides are produced in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, gut hormones are widely expressed outside the gut. The different cell types often express different products of the same gene and release the peptides in different ways. Consequently, the same peptide may act as a hormone, a local growth factor, or a neurotransmitter. This new biology suggests that gastrointestinal hormones should be conceived as intercellular messengers of major general impact. The following short review is a vignette on steps in the history of gastrointestinal endocrinology from classic studies of digestive juice secretion over peptide chemistry, immunochemistry, and molecular genetics to modern receptor pharmacology and drug development. From shadowy beginnings, gastrointestinal endocrinology has emerged as a central discipline in the understanding of multicellular life and its diseases.
Original languageEnglish
JournalRegulatory Peptides
Volume177 Suppl
Pages (from-to)S1-5
ISSN0167-0115
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Research areas

  • Animals, Cell Membrane, Drug Therapy, Endocrine Glands, Endocrinology, Gastrointestinal Hormones, Gastrointestinal Tract, Genes, Regulator, History, 20th Century, History, 21st Century, Humans, Neuroendocrine Tumors, Peptide Hormones, Phylogeny, Radioimmunoassay

ID: 36789807