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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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BCI using imaginary movements: the simulator

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  • Darius A Rohani
  • William S Henning
  • Carsten E. Thomsen
  • Troels W Kjaer
  • Sadasivan Puthusserypady
  • Helge B D Sorensen
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Over the past two decades, much progress has been made in the rapidly evolving field of Brain Computer Interface (BCI). This paper presents a novel concept: a BCI-simulator, which has been developed for the Hex-O-Spell interface, using the sensory motor rhythms (SMR) paradigm. With the simulator, it is possible to evaluate how the model parameters such as error classifications, delay between classifications and success rate affect the communication rate. Another advantage of the simulator is that it allows us to study for more classes than most online BCI systems which are limited to only two classes. Results show that the BCI simulator is able to give a deeper understanding of the feedback systems. We also find that a 3-class system is more efficient than a 2-class system if it obtains a success rate of at least 55% of the 2-class system.
Original languageEnglish
JournalComputer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine
Volume111
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)300-7
Number of pages8
ISSN0169-2607
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

ID: 42521331