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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Barriers to post-diagnostic care and support in minority ethnic communities: A survey of Danish primary care dementia coordinators

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DOI

  1. Rotational care practices in minority ethnic families managing dementia: A qualitative study

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  2. Coping with Dementia

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  2. Global Prevalence of Young-Onset Dementia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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  3. Barriers in access to dementia care in minority ethnic groups in Denmark: a qualitative study

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  4. Cross-cultural neuropsychological assessment in the European Union: a Delphi expert study

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BACKGROUND: People from minority ethnic groups are under-represented in dementia diagnosis, treatment, and care. The aim of this study was to examine barriers to accessing post-diagnostic care and support in minority ethnic communities from the perspective of primary care dementia coordinators in Denmark.

METHOD: A survey questionnaire investigating issues related to provision of care and support services in minority ethnic communities was conducted among 41 primary care dementia coordinators representing all Danish geographic regions. Responses were primarily based on five-point Likert scales. Results from geographic regions with different rates of people from minority ethnic communities with dementia were compared.

RESULTS: Among the surveyed dementia coordinators, 95% generally thought that providing dementia care and support services to minority ethnic service users was challenging. Strategies for overcoming cultural and linguistic barriers were generally sparse. Uptake of most post-diagnostic services was perceived to be influenced by service users' minority ethnic background. Communication difficulties, poor knowledge about dementia among minority ethnic service users, inadequate cultural sensitivity of care workers, and a lack of suitable dementia services for minority ethnic communities were highlighted as some of the main barriers. Not surprisingly, 97% generally found minority ethnic families to be more involved in provision of personal care and support compared to ethnic Danish families.

CONCLUSION: There is a need to develop methods and models for post-diagnostic care and support that include cultural awareness and diversity for interacting with different cultural communities.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDementia
Volume19
Issue number8
Pages (from-to)2702-2713
Number of pages12
ISSN1471-3012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

    Research areas

  • access, dementia, ethnicity, healthcare, inequality, minority

ID: 58020098