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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Associations between Inhaled Corticosteroid Use in the First 6 Years of Life and Obesity-related Traits

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  1. Trajectory of Preserved Ratio Impaired Spirometry: Natural History and Long-Term Prognosis

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  2. Evidence-based Definition for Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

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  1. The developing airway and gut microbiota in early life is influenced by age of older siblings

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  2. Height and bone mineral content after inhaled corticosteroid use in the first 6 years of life

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  3. Neonatal metabolome of caesarean section and risk of childhood asthma

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  4. Objective confirmation of asthma diagnosis, treatment adherence and patient outcomes in children and adolescents

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Rationale: Infants and young children might be particularly likely to experience the potential clinical side effects of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) on body mass index (BMI), adiposity rebound (AR), and body composition, but this has rarely been studied in long-term studies in this age group. Objectives: To determine the association between ICS exposure in the first 6 years of life and the BMI, AR, body composition, and blood lipid concentrations. Methods: Children from the two mother-child cohorts of the COPSAC (Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood) were included. ICS use was registered prospectively to age 6 years, and the cumulative dose was calculated. Multiple linear regression models were used for analysis. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 932 (84%) of the 1,111 children from the COPSAC cohorts had BMI data, 786 (71%) had dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan data at the age of 6 years, and 815 (73%) had an AR age calculated. Two hundred ninety-one children (31%) received a cumulative ICS dose higher than that from 10 weeks of standard treatment before the age of 6. ICS treatment during 0-6 years of age was associated with an increased BMI z-score (0.05 [95% confidence interval, 0.005 to 0.09] SDs per each year of standard treatment; P = 0.03) an earlier age at AR (-0.18 [95% confidence interval, -0.28 to -0.08] yr; P = 0.0006), and a 2% increased geometric mean android fat percentage (P = 0.05). ICS exposure and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan data were not associated. Conclusions: ICS use in early childhood was associated with an increased BMI z-score at age 6, an earlier AR, and a trend of association with an increased android body fat percentage.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume204
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)642-650
Number of pages9
ISSN1073-449X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Sep 2021

    Research areas

  • Absorptiometry, Photon, Adiposity/drug effects, Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects, Anti-Asthmatic Agents/adverse effects, Asthma/complications, Body Mass Index, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Infant, Linear Models, Male, Pediatric Obesity/chemically induced, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors

ID: 74542252