Association between vascular inflammation and inflammation in adipose tissue, spleen, and bone marrow in patients with psoriasis

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psoriasis is associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) with significant overlap of inflammatory pathways. A link between vascular inflammation and inflammation in multiple adipose tissue types, spleen, and bone marrow may exist. Therefore, we investigated these associations using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) in patients with psoriasis (n = 83) where half had established CVD. Carotid ultrasound imaging was also performed. Inflammation was measured by FDG uptake in the aorta, visceral- (VAT), subcutaneous- (SAT), and pericardial (PAT) adipose tissues, and spleen and bone marrow, respectively. Vascular inflammation was associated with FDG uptakes in all adipose tissues, including VAT (β = 0.26; p < 0.001), SAT (β = 0.28; p < 0.001), PAT (β = 0.24; p < 0.001), spleen (β = 1.35; p = 0.001), and bone marrow (β = 1.14; p < 0.001). Adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein did not change the results. These associations were generally preserved in the patients without prior CVD. No associations were observed between vascular inflammation and carotid intima-media thickness or presence of carotid plaques, respectively. The results suggest an inflammatory link between vascular and adipose tissues, spleen, and bone marrow in patients with psoriasis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number305
JournalLife
Volume11
Issue number4
ISSN2075-1729
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • F-FDG-PET/CT
  • Adipose tissue
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Psoriasis
  • Vascular inflammation
  • CT
  • cardiovascular disease
  • F-18-FDG-PET
  • psoriasis
  • adipose tissue
  • vascular inflammation

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