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Association between Neonatal Whole Blood Iron Content and Cytokines, Adipokines, and Other Immune Response Proteins

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  1. Perinatal Whole Blood Zinc Status and Cytokines, Adipokines, and Other Immune Response Proteins

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  4. Perinatal Whole Blood Zinc Status and Cytokines, Adipokines, and Other Immune Response Proteins

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(1) Background: High iron associates with inflammation and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Iron is essential not only for neonatal development but also for infectious microorganisms. The neonatal immune system is immature, and innate immunity prevails before immunocompetence develops. (2) Methods: In 398 newborns from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank, we examined if whole blood iron (WB-Iron) content were associated with cytokines, adipokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) in non-infected healthy neonates, and if these associations differed in newborns who later developed T1D (cases) (n = 199). WB-Iron was quantified using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry on the neonatal dried blood spots. For each analyte, the relative change (RC) in the mean level was modeled by robust log-normal regression. (3) Results: A one unit increase in neonatal WB-Iron was associated with a 38% decrease in mean interleukin (IL)-6 levels (0.62; 95% CI: 0.40⁻0.95, p = 0.03), and a 37% decrease in mean MBL levels (0.63; 95% CI: 0.41⁻0.95, p = 0.03), but was not statistically significant after correction for multiple testing. (4) Conclusions: In summary, we found that higher neonatal WB-iron content was inversely associated with IL-6 and MBL, which may increase susceptibility to infections.

Original languageEnglish
Article number543
JournalNutrients
Volume11
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)543
ISSN2072-6643
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

    Research areas

  • Adipokines, C-reactive protein, Cytokines, Diabetes mellitus, Human, Infant, Iron, Mannose-binding lectin, Newborn, TREM1, Type 1

ID: 56845742