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Association between habitual sleep duration/quality and appetite markers in individuals with obesity

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Nymo, Siren ; Kleppe, Malin M ; Coutinho, Silvia R ; Rehfeld, Jens F ; Kulseng, Bård ; Martins, Catia. / Association between habitual sleep duration/quality and appetite markers in individuals with obesity. In: Physiology & Behavior. 2021 ; Vol. 232.

Bibtex

@article{f4e29743458a49b7b0ce2836f66e51c6,
title = "Association between habitual sleep duration/quality and appetite markers in individuals with obesity",
abstract = "STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess if habitual sleep duration/quality was associated with appetite in individuals with obesity, and if the association was modulated by sex.METHODS: Sleep duration/quality was measured with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score in 95 healthy adults with obesity (BMI: 36.6 ± 4.2 kg/m2). Subjective feelings of appetite were assessed using visual analogue scales, and plasma concentrations of active ghrelin, total peptide YY, active glucagon-like peptide 1, cholecystokinin (CCK) and insulin were measured in fasting and every 30 min up to 2.5 h after a meal.RESULTS: No significant associations were found between sleep duration, or overall quality, and appetite in all participants. However, a worse sleep efficiency was associated with lower postprandial CCK, a shorter habitual sleep was associated with lower postprandial desire to eat and a lower daytime dysfunction was associated with higher prospective food consumption in fasting (P<0.05, for all). In males, a shorter habitual sleep duration and a worse subjective sleep quality were associated with increased basal and postprandial active ghrelin (P<0.05, P<0.01, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). Also, a shorter habitual sleep was associated with lower basal and postprandial insulin (P<0.05 for both) and a worse overall sleep quality with lower postprandial insulin (P<0.05). In females, a worse overall sleep quality was associated with lower postprandial active ghrelin (P<0.05), and short habitual sleep with higher postprandial insulin (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: A worse habitual sleep efficiency is associated with blunted postprandial CCK secretion in individuals with obesity. The association between habitual sleep duration/quality and insulin and active ghrelin seems to be modulated by sex, but more studies are needed to confirm these findings.",
author = "Siren Nymo and Kleppe, {Malin M} and Coutinho, {Silvia R} and Rehfeld, {Jens F} and B{\aa}rd Kulseng and Catia Martins",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = apr,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.physbeh.2021.113345",
language = "English",
volume = "232",
journal = "Physiology and Behavior",
issn = "0031-9384",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between habitual sleep duration/quality and appetite markers in individuals with obesity

AU - Nymo, Siren

AU - Kleppe, Malin M

AU - Coutinho, Silvia R

AU - Rehfeld, Jens F

AU - Kulseng, Bård

AU - Martins, Catia

N1 - Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/4/1

Y1 - 2021/4/1

N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess if habitual sleep duration/quality was associated with appetite in individuals with obesity, and if the association was modulated by sex.METHODS: Sleep duration/quality was measured with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score in 95 healthy adults with obesity (BMI: 36.6 ± 4.2 kg/m2). Subjective feelings of appetite were assessed using visual analogue scales, and plasma concentrations of active ghrelin, total peptide YY, active glucagon-like peptide 1, cholecystokinin (CCK) and insulin were measured in fasting and every 30 min up to 2.5 h after a meal.RESULTS: No significant associations were found between sleep duration, or overall quality, and appetite in all participants. However, a worse sleep efficiency was associated with lower postprandial CCK, a shorter habitual sleep was associated with lower postprandial desire to eat and a lower daytime dysfunction was associated with higher prospective food consumption in fasting (P<0.05, for all). In males, a shorter habitual sleep duration and a worse subjective sleep quality were associated with increased basal and postprandial active ghrelin (P<0.05, P<0.01, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). Also, a shorter habitual sleep was associated with lower basal and postprandial insulin (P<0.05 for both) and a worse overall sleep quality with lower postprandial insulin (P<0.05). In females, a worse overall sleep quality was associated with lower postprandial active ghrelin (P<0.05), and short habitual sleep with higher postprandial insulin (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: A worse habitual sleep efficiency is associated with blunted postprandial CCK secretion in individuals with obesity. The association between habitual sleep duration/quality and insulin and active ghrelin seems to be modulated by sex, but more studies are needed to confirm these findings.

AB - STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess if habitual sleep duration/quality was associated with appetite in individuals with obesity, and if the association was modulated by sex.METHODS: Sleep duration/quality was measured with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score in 95 healthy adults with obesity (BMI: 36.6 ± 4.2 kg/m2). Subjective feelings of appetite were assessed using visual analogue scales, and plasma concentrations of active ghrelin, total peptide YY, active glucagon-like peptide 1, cholecystokinin (CCK) and insulin were measured in fasting and every 30 min up to 2.5 h after a meal.RESULTS: No significant associations were found between sleep duration, or overall quality, and appetite in all participants. However, a worse sleep efficiency was associated with lower postprandial CCK, a shorter habitual sleep was associated with lower postprandial desire to eat and a lower daytime dysfunction was associated with higher prospective food consumption in fasting (P<0.05, for all). In males, a shorter habitual sleep duration and a worse subjective sleep quality were associated with increased basal and postprandial active ghrelin (P<0.05, P<0.01, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). Also, a shorter habitual sleep was associated with lower basal and postprandial insulin (P<0.05 for both) and a worse overall sleep quality with lower postprandial insulin (P<0.05). In females, a worse overall sleep quality was associated with lower postprandial active ghrelin (P<0.05), and short habitual sleep with higher postprandial insulin (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: A worse habitual sleep efficiency is associated with blunted postprandial CCK secretion in individuals with obesity. The association between habitual sleep duration/quality and insulin and active ghrelin seems to be modulated by sex, but more studies are needed to confirm these findings.

U2 - 10.1016/j.physbeh.2021.113345

DO - 10.1016/j.physbeh.2021.113345

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33524425

VL - 232

JO - Physiology and Behavior

JF - Physiology and Behavior

SN - 0031-9384

M1 - 113345

ER -

ID: 64231019