Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Assessment of laypersons' paediatric basic life support and foreign body airway obstruction management skills: a validity study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. First-response treatment after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a survey of current practices across 29 countries in Europe

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. The Danish prehospital emergency healthcare system and research possibilities

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. New clinical guidelines on the spinal stabilisation of adult trauma patients - consensus and evidence based

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Patient experience of spinal immobilisation after trauma

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Social ties influence teamwork when managing clinical emergencies

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Point-of-care ultrasound for general practitioners: a systematic needs assessment

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Standardised courses for laypeople in Paediatric Basic Life Support (PBLS) and Foreign Body Airway Obstruction Management (FBAOM) teach essential skills for the initiation of resuscitation by bystanders. Performance assessments are necessary to ensure that skills are acquired. We aimed to examine the validity of developed performance assessments and to determine credible pass/fail standards.

METHODS: Validity evidence was gathered in a standardised simulated setting by testing participants with three different levels of PBLS/FBAOM experience: untrained laypersons, trained laypersons, and lifeguards. Two blinded raters assessed participants' performance. The reliability of test scores was analysed using generalizability theory, scores were compared across the three groups, and pass/fail-standards were established.

RESULTS: A total of 33 participants were included. More than two raters and two cases were necessary for PBLS to achieve a reliability coefficient above 0.80, which is considered the minimally acceptable level for high-stakes certification. For FBAOM, two tests or three raters were needed. Assessment scores differed across the three groups for PBLS skills, as well as for FBAOM skills (p < 0.001). Pass levels of 74% and 55% of the maximum score for PBLS and FBAOM, respectively, were identified as the levels that best discriminated between competent and non-competent laypersons.

CONCLUSIONS: Laypersons' PBLS and FBAOM skills can be assessed in a reliable and valid way in a standardised simulated setting. However, multiple raters and scenario tests are needed to ensure sufficient reliability, which raises questions regarding the feasibility of performing certification tests for laypersons who participate in short paediatric resuscitation courses.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Volume26
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)73
ISSN1757-7241
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

ID: 55417235