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Arterial stiffness in people with Type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnoea

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@article{8265681775dd4a52ab3b32fec3d7348b,
title = "Arterial stiffness in people with Type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnoea",
abstract = "AIMS: To examine whether people with Type 2 diabetes with concurrent obstructive sleep apnoea have increased arterial stiffness as compared with people with Type 2 diabetes without obstructive sleep apnoea.METHODS: In a study with a case-control design, 40 people with Type 2 diabetes and treatment-na{\"i}ve moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea (Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index ≥15) and a control group of 31 people with Type 2 diabetes without obstructive sleep apnoea (Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index <5) were examined. Obstructive sleep apnoea status was evaluated using the ApneaLink{\textregistered} + home-monitoring device (Resmed Inc., San Diego, CA, USA), providing the Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index scores. Arterial stiffness was assessed according to carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity using the Sphygmocor device and the oscillometric Mobil-O-Graph{\textregistered} (I.E.M. GmbH, Stolberg, Germany).RESULTS: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was not significantly different between participants with Type 2 diabetes with obstructive sleep apnoea and those without obstructive sleep apnoea (10.7±2.2 m/s vs 10.3±2.1 m/s; P=0.513), whereas oscillometric pulse wave velocity was significantly higher in participants with Type 2 diabetes with obstructive sleep apnoea than in those without obstructive sleep apnoea (9.5±1.0 m/s vs 8.6±1.4 m/s; P=0.002). In multiple regression analysis, age (P=0.002), gender (men; P=0.018) and HbA1c (P=0.027) were associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and systolic blood pressure (P=0.004) and age (P<0.001) were associated with oscillometric pulse wave velocity. After adjustment, presence of obstructive sleep apnoea was not independently associated with pulse wave velocity whether assessed by tonometry or oscillometry.CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the present study did not find an age- and blood pressure-independent association between moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea and arterial stiffness in non-sleepy people with Type 2 diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "{Hvelplund Kristiansen}, M and Bangh{\o}j, {A M} and E Laugesen and L Tarnow",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1111/dme.13666",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "1391--1398",
journal = "Diabetic Medicine",
issn = "1464-5491",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Arterial stiffness in people with Type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnoea

AU - Hvelplund Kristiansen, M

AU - Banghøj, A M

AU - Laugesen, E

AU - Tarnow, L

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - AIMS: To examine whether people with Type 2 diabetes with concurrent obstructive sleep apnoea have increased arterial stiffness as compared with people with Type 2 diabetes without obstructive sleep apnoea.METHODS: In a study with a case-control design, 40 people with Type 2 diabetes and treatment-naïve moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea (Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index ≥15) and a control group of 31 people with Type 2 diabetes without obstructive sleep apnoea (Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index <5) were examined. Obstructive sleep apnoea status was evaluated using the ApneaLink® + home-monitoring device (Resmed Inc., San Diego, CA, USA), providing the Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index scores. Arterial stiffness was assessed according to carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity using the Sphygmocor device and the oscillometric Mobil-O-Graph® (I.E.M. GmbH, Stolberg, Germany).RESULTS: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was not significantly different between participants with Type 2 diabetes with obstructive sleep apnoea and those without obstructive sleep apnoea (10.7±2.2 m/s vs 10.3±2.1 m/s; P=0.513), whereas oscillometric pulse wave velocity was significantly higher in participants with Type 2 diabetes with obstructive sleep apnoea than in those without obstructive sleep apnoea (9.5±1.0 m/s vs 8.6±1.4 m/s; P=0.002). In multiple regression analysis, age (P=0.002), gender (men; P=0.018) and HbA1c (P=0.027) were associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and systolic blood pressure (P=0.004) and age (P<0.001) were associated with oscillometric pulse wave velocity. After adjustment, presence of obstructive sleep apnoea was not independently associated with pulse wave velocity whether assessed by tonometry or oscillometry.CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the present study did not find an age- and blood pressure-independent association between moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea and arterial stiffness in non-sleepy people with Type 2 diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - AIMS: To examine whether people with Type 2 diabetes with concurrent obstructive sleep apnoea have increased arterial stiffness as compared with people with Type 2 diabetes without obstructive sleep apnoea.METHODS: In a study with a case-control design, 40 people with Type 2 diabetes and treatment-naïve moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea (Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index ≥15) and a control group of 31 people with Type 2 diabetes without obstructive sleep apnoea (Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index <5) were examined. Obstructive sleep apnoea status was evaluated using the ApneaLink® + home-monitoring device (Resmed Inc., San Diego, CA, USA), providing the Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index scores. Arterial stiffness was assessed according to carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity using the Sphygmocor device and the oscillometric Mobil-O-Graph® (I.E.M. GmbH, Stolberg, Germany).RESULTS: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was not significantly different between participants with Type 2 diabetes with obstructive sleep apnoea and those without obstructive sleep apnoea (10.7±2.2 m/s vs 10.3±2.1 m/s; P=0.513), whereas oscillometric pulse wave velocity was significantly higher in participants with Type 2 diabetes with obstructive sleep apnoea than in those without obstructive sleep apnoea (9.5±1.0 m/s vs 8.6±1.4 m/s; P=0.002). In multiple regression analysis, age (P=0.002), gender (men; P=0.018) and HbA1c (P=0.027) were associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and systolic blood pressure (P=0.004) and age (P<0.001) were associated with oscillometric pulse wave velocity. After adjustment, presence of obstructive sleep apnoea was not independently associated with pulse wave velocity whether assessed by tonometry or oscillometry.CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the present study did not find an age- and blood pressure-independent association between moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea and arterial stiffness in non-sleepy people with Type 2 diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1111/dme.13666

DO - 10.1111/dme.13666

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29763980

VL - 35

SP - 1391

EP - 1398

JO - Diabetic Medicine

JF - Diabetic Medicine

SN - 1464-5491

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 53793063