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Arterial and venous thrombosis by high platelet count and high hematocrit: 108 521 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study

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@article{a98a4799145c4840b0a000198d3b3fbb,
title = "Arterial and venous thrombosis by high platelet count and high hematocrit: 108 521 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether high platelet count or high hematocrit predict risk of thrombosis in individuals from the general population.OBJECTIVES: We tested the hypothesis that individuals from the general population with high platelet count or high hematocrit have high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis.METHODS: We prospectively followed 108 521 individuals from The Copenhagen General Population Study for a median of 8 years. Platelet count and blood hematocrit were measured at study entry.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for individuals with platelet counts in the top 5 percentiles (>398 × 109 /L) vs in the 25th-75th percentiles (231-316 × 109 /L) were 1.77 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.38-2.24) for arterial thrombosis in the brain (38 and 26 events/10 000 person-years) and 0.82 (95{\%}, 0.61-1.11) for arterial thrombosis in the heart (23 and 28 events/10 000 person-years). For individuals with hematocrit values in the top 5 percentiles (women/men: >45/>48{\%}) vs the 25th-75th percentiles (women/men: 38.1-42/41.1-45{\%}), hazard ratios were 1.27 (95{\%} CI, 0.91-1.75) for arterial thrombosis in the brain (40 and 26 events/10 000 person-years) and 1.46 (95{\%} CI, 1.06-2.00) for arterial thrombosis in the heart (43 and 25 events/10 000 person-years). Neither high platelet count nor high hematocrit was associated with risk of venous thromboembolism. When excluding individuals with myeloproliferative neoplasia from the main analyses, results on risk of thrombosis were similar. In this prospective study, high platelet counts were associated with 1.8-fold risk of arterial thrombosis in the brain, whereas high hematocrit was associated with 1.5-fold risk of arterial thrombosis in the heart.",
author = "Marie Warny and Jens Helby and Birgens, {Henrik S} and Bojesen, {Stig E} and Nordestgaard, {B{\o}rge G}",
note = "{\circledC} 2019 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1111/jth.14574",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "1898--1911",
journal = "Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis",
issn = "1538-7933",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Arterial and venous thrombosis by high platelet count and high hematocrit

T2 - 108 521 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study

AU - Warny, Marie

AU - Helby, Jens

AU - Birgens, Henrik S

AU - Bojesen, Stig E

AU - Nordestgaard, Børge G

N1 - © 2019 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether high platelet count or high hematocrit predict risk of thrombosis in individuals from the general population.OBJECTIVES: We tested the hypothesis that individuals from the general population with high platelet count or high hematocrit have high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis.METHODS: We prospectively followed 108 521 individuals from The Copenhagen General Population Study for a median of 8 years. Platelet count and blood hematocrit were measured at study entry.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for individuals with platelet counts in the top 5 percentiles (>398 × 109 /L) vs in the 25th-75th percentiles (231-316 × 109 /L) were 1.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-2.24) for arterial thrombosis in the brain (38 and 26 events/10 000 person-years) and 0.82 (95%, 0.61-1.11) for arterial thrombosis in the heart (23 and 28 events/10 000 person-years). For individuals with hematocrit values in the top 5 percentiles (women/men: >45/>48%) vs the 25th-75th percentiles (women/men: 38.1-42/41.1-45%), hazard ratios were 1.27 (95% CI, 0.91-1.75) for arterial thrombosis in the brain (40 and 26 events/10 000 person-years) and 1.46 (95% CI, 1.06-2.00) for arterial thrombosis in the heart (43 and 25 events/10 000 person-years). Neither high platelet count nor high hematocrit was associated with risk of venous thromboembolism. When excluding individuals with myeloproliferative neoplasia from the main analyses, results on risk of thrombosis were similar. In this prospective study, high platelet counts were associated with 1.8-fold risk of arterial thrombosis in the brain, whereas high hematocrit was associated with 1.5-fold risk of arterial thrombosis in the heart.

AB - BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether high platelet count or high hematocrit predict risk of thrombosis in individuals from the general population.OBJECTIVES: We tested the hypothesis that individuals from the general population with high platelet count or high hematocrit have high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis.METHODS: We prospectively followed 108 521 individuals from The Copenhagen General Population Study for a median of 8 years. Platelet count and blood hematocrit were measured at study entry.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for individuals with platelet counts in the top 5 percentiles (>398 × 109 /L) vs in the 25th-75th percentiles (231-316 × 109 /L) were 1.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-2.24) for arterial thrombosis in the brain (38 and 26 events/10 000 person-years) and 0.82 (95%, 0.61-1.11) for arterial thrombosis in the heart (23 and 28 events/10 000 person-years). For individuals with hematocrit values in the top 5 percentiles (women/men: >45/>48%) vs the 25th-75th percentiles (women/men: 38.1-42/41.1-45%), hazard ratios were 1.27 (95% CI, 0.91-1.75) for arterial thrombosis in the brain (40 and 26 events/10 000 person-years) and 1.46 (95% CI, 1.06-2.00) for arterial thrombosis in the heart (43 and 25 events/10 000 person-years). Neither high platelet count nor high hematocrit was associated with risk of venous thromboembolism. When excluding individuals with myeloproliferative neoplasia from the main analyses, results on risk of thrombosis were similar. In this prospective study, high platelet counts were associated with 1.8-fold risk of arterial thrombosis in the brain, whereas high hematocrit was associated with 1.5-fold risk of arterial thrombosis in the heart.

U2 - 10.1111/jth.14574

DO - 10.1111/jth.14574

M3 - Journal article

VL - 17

SP - 1898

EP - 1911

JO - Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis

JF - Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis

SN - 1538-7933

IS - 11

ER -

ID: 59306927