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Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Seropositivity Among Medical Students in Copenhagen

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@article{a546c4d46f4a4c04b475b7fce66e3d25,
title = "Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Seropositivity Among Medical Students in Copenhagen",
abstract = "Background: Health care workers are at a higher risk of getting infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) than the general population. Knowledge about medical students' exposure to SARS-CoV-2 is lacking. Thus, we measured the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in a cohort of Danish medical students.Methods: We invited all medical students at the University of Copenhagen (UCPH) to participate. Students underwent venous blood sampling and a questionnaire about work-life behaviors possibly associated with SARS-CoV-2 exposure and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms. Samples were analyzed for total immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, and seropositive samples were screened for IgG, immunoglobulin M, and immunoglobulin A antibodies. We determined associations between seropositivity and clinical and social activities and self-reported symptoms.Results: Between October 19 and 26, 1120 students participated in the questionnaire and 1096 were included. Of all included, 379 (34.58%) were seropositive. Seropositivity was associated with attendance at 2 parties at UCPH, on February 29 and March 6, 2020 (odds ratio [OR], 5.96; 95% CI, 4.34-8.24; P < .001). Four hundred sixty-one students (42.06%) worked with COVID-19 patients, which was significantly associated with seropositivity (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.03-1.85; P = .033). The symptom most associated with seropositivity was loss of smell and/or taste (n = 183 of all, 31.35%; OR, 24.48; 95% CI, 15.49-40.60; P < .001). Bachelor's students were significantly more likely to be seropositive than Master's students (42.28% vs 16.87%; P < .001).Conclusions: Medical students have the highest reported seropositivity in the Danish health care system. In this cohort of students at UCPH, seropositivity was associated with social behavior markers and, to a lesser extent, with self-reported contact with SARS-CoV-2-infected patients.",
author = "Madsen, {Johannes R} and Nielsen, {Jacob P S} and Kamille Fogh and Hansen, {Cecilie B} and Nielsen, {Pernille B} and Theis Lange and Hasselbalch, {Rasmus B} and Peter Garred and Kasper Iversen",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America.",
year = "2021",
month = aug,
day = "19",
doi = "10.1093/ofid/ofab273",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "ofab273",
journal = "Open Forum Infectious Diseases",
issn = "2328-8957",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Seropositivity Among Medical Students in Copenhagen

AU - Madsen, Johannes R

AU - Nielsen, Jacob P S

AU - Fogh, Kamille

AU - Hansen, Cecilie B

AU - Nielsen, Pernille B

AU - Lange, Theis

AU - Hasselbalch, Rasmus B

AU - Garred, Peter

AU - Iversen, Kasper

N1 - © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America.

PY - 2021/8/19

Y1 - 2021/8/19

N2 - Background: Health care workers are at a higher risk of getting infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) than the general population. Knowledge about medical students' exposure to SARS-CoV-2 is lacking. Thus, we measured the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in a cohort of Danish medical students.Methods: We invited all medical students at the University of Copenhagen (UCPH) to participate. Students underwent venous blood sampling and a questionnaire about work-life behaviors possibly associated with SARS-CoV-2 exposure and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms. Samples were analyzed for total immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, and seropositive samples were screened for IgG, immunoglobulin M, and immunoglobulin A antibodies. We determined associations between seropositivity and clinical and social activities and self-reported symptoms.Results: Between October 19 and 26, 1120 students participated in the questionnaire and 1096 were included. Of all included, 379 (34.58%) were seropositive. Seropositivity was associated with attendance at 2 parties at UCPH, on February 29 and March 6, 2020 (odds ratio [OR], 5.96; 95% CI, 4.34-8.24; P < .001). Four hundred sixty-one students (42.06%) worked with COVID-19 patients, which was significantly associated with seropositivity (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.03-1.85; P = .033). The symptom most associated with seropositivity was loss of smell and/or taste (n = 183 of all, 31.35%; OR, 24.48; 95% CI, 15.49-40.60; P < .001). Bachelor's students were significantly more likely to be seropositive than Master's students (42.28% vs 16.87%; P < .001).Conclusions: Medical students have the highest reported seropositivity in the Danish health care system. In this cohort of students at UCPH, seropositivity was associated with social behavior markers and, to a lesser extent, with self-reported contact with SARS-CoV-2-infected patients.

AB - Background: Health care workers are at a higher risk of getting infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) than the general population. Knowledge about medical students' exposure to SARS-CoV-2 is lacking. Thus, we measured the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in a cohort of Danish medical students.Methods: We invited all medical students at the University of Copenhagen (UCPH) to participate. Students underwent venous blood sampling and a questionnaire about work-life behaviors possibly associated with SARS-CoV-2 exposure and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms. Samples were analyzed for total immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, and seropositive samples were screened for IgG, immunoglobulin M, and immunoglobulin A antibodies. We determined associations between seropositivity and clinical and social activities and self-reported symptoms.Results: Between October 19 and 26, 1120 students participated in the questionnaire and 1096 were included. Of all included, 379 (34.58%) were seropositive. Seropositivity was associated with attendance at 2 parties at UCPH, on February 29 and March 6, 2020 (odds ratio [OR], 5.96; 95% CI, 4.34-8.24; P < .001). Four hundred sixty-one students (42.06%) worked with COVID-19 patients, which was significantly associated with seropositivity (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.03-1.85; P = .033). The symptom most associated with seropositivity was loss of smell and/or taste (n = 183 of all, 31.35%; OR, 24.48; 95% CI, 15.49-40.60; P < .001). Bachelor's students were significantly more likely to be seropositive than Master's students (42.28% vs 16.87%; P < .001).Conclusions: Medical students have the highest reported seropositivity in the Danish health care system. In this cohort of students at UCPH, seropositivity was associated with social behavior markers and, to a lesser extent, with self-reported contact with SARS-CoV-2-infected patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85116730749&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/ofid/ofab273

DO - 10.1093/ofid/ofab273

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34423066

VL - 8

SP - ofab273

JO - Open Forum Infectious Diseases

JF - Open Forum Infectious Diseases

SN - 2328-8957

IS - 8

M1 - ofab273

ER -

ID: 67306172