Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Antibiotic resistance patterns of Escherichia coli in migrants versus non-migrants: a study of 14,561 urine samples

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Cystic echinococcosis of the liver: experience from a danish tertiary reference center (2002-2010)

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Japanese encephalitis in a Danish short-term traveler to Cambodia

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. High rate of failure in treatment of imported schistosomiasis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Aeromedical transport after acute myocardial infarction

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Community-acquired meningitis caused by beta-haemolytic streptococci in adults: a nationwide population-based cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Undocumented migrant children in Denmark present with diverse health needs and sometimes have critical health conditions

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Prevalence of infective endocarditis in patients with positive blood cultures: a Danish nationwide study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: To investigate differences in distribution of urine isolates and antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli (E. coli), the predominant uropathogen, in migrants and non-migrant individuals.

METHODS: We linked a cohort consisting of all migrants obtaining residence as refugees or family-reunited migrants in Denmark between January 1993 and December 2015 to hospital urine samples examined from January 2000 to December 2015 at the Department of Microbiology, University Hospital Hvidovre, Denmark. Samples from non-migrant individuals, Danish-born from Danish parents, were included as comparison. Analysis was carried out using multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS: 14,561 first time urine samples were included, with E. coli being the most prevalent bacterial pathogen. Of the identified isolates 4,686/11,737 were E. coli among non-migrants and 1,032/2,824 among migrants.Sulfamethoxazol-Trimethoprim resistance was found in 34.3% (350/1020) of E. coli isolates among migrants and 23.2% (1070/4619) among non-migrant patients (Odds ratio (OR) 1.73, 95%CI: 1.47-2.03). Ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 5.8% (36/618) of isolates among migrants and 2.2% (67/3092) among non-migrants (OR 2.20, 95%CI:1.37-3.53). Gentamicin resistance was seen in 10.8% (61/565) and 4.7% (110/2328) of isolates (OR 2.33, 95%CI:1.63-3.34), Cefuroxime resistance in 8.5% (87/1019) and 3.4% (158/4618) (OR 2.40, 95%CI:1.77-3.24), Ampicillin resistance in 51.4% and 40.8% (OR 1.65, 95%CI: 1.42-1.92), and Piperacillin-Tazobactam resistance in 6.9 % (30/432) and 4.2% (65/1532) for migrant and non-migrant patients respectively. When stratifying according to migrant status, family-reunited had higher odds of resistance than refugees for Sulfamethoxazol-Trimethoprim, Gentamicin, and Ampicillin.

CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of antibiotic resistance was significantly higher in E. coli isolates among migrants, both refugees and family reunited, than non-migrant patients. Differences could not be explained by comorbidity or income. The results emphasise the importance of urine sample testing in both local-born and migrants before antibiotic start-up and points to the benefit of considering migration to secure individual treatment and equal health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Travel Medicine
ISSN1195-1982
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Oct 2019

ID: 58290347