Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Anaesthesia care with and without tracheal intubation during emergency endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding: a population-based cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Minimising droplet and virus spread during and after tracheal extubation

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  2. Enhanced recovery after surgery components and perioperative outcomes: a nationwide observational study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Sphenopalatine ganglion block for the treatment of postdural puncture headache: a randomised, blinded, clinical trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Use of the GRADE approach in systematic reviews and guidelines

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearchpeer-review

  1. Preoperative high-dose Steroids in Total Knee and Hip Arthroplasty - Protocols for three randomized controlled trials

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Emergency laparotomy success - optimisation or triage?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. A challenging journey: The experience of elderly patients and their close family members after major emergency abdominal surgery

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Response

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Emergency upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common condition with high mortality. Most patients undergo oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD), but no universally agreed approach exists to the type of airway management required during the procedure. We aimed to compare anaesthesia care with tracheal intubation (TI group) and without airway instrumentation (monitored anaesthesia care, MAC group) during emergency OGD.

METHODS: This was a prospective, nationwide, population-based cohort study during 2006-13. Emergency OGDs performed under anaesthesia care were included. End points were 90 day mortality (primary) and length of stay in hospital (secondary). Associations between exposure and outcomes were assessed in logistic and linear regression models, adjusted for the following potential confounders: shock at admission, level of anaesthetic expertise present, ASA score, Charlson comorbidity index score, BMI, age, sex, alcohol use, referral origin (home or in-hospital), Forrest classification, ulcer localization, and postoperative care.

RESULTS: The study group comprised 3580 patients under anaesthesia care: 2101 (59%) for the TI group and 1479 (41%) for the MAC group. During the first 90 days after OGD, 18.9% in the TI group and 18.4% in the MAC group died, crude odds ratio=1.03 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.87-1.23, P=0.701], adjusted odds ratio=0.95 (95% CI=0.79-1.15, P=0.590). Patients in the TI group stayed slightly longer in hospital [mean 8.16 (95% CI=7.63-8.60) vs 7.63 days (95%=CI 6.92-8.33), P=0.108 in adjusted analysis].

CONCLUSIONS: In this large population-based cohort study, anaesthesia care with TI was not different from anaesthesia care without airway instrumentation in patients undergoing emergency OGD in terms of 90 day mortality and length of hospital stay.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume114
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)901-8
Number of pages8
ISSN0007-0912
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

ID: 45390128