Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

An automatic measure of progression during colonoscopy correlates to patient experienced pain

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Plasma calprotectin is superior to serum calprotectin as a biomarker of intestinal inflammation in ulcerative Colitis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Gastric cancer and gastrin: on the interaction of Helicobacter pylori gastritis and acid inhibitory induced hypergastrinemia

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. The clinical course of common bile duct stone clearance with endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreaticography

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Laparoscopy to Assist Surgical Decisions Related to Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Neonates

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Development and validation of a multiple-choice questionnaire-based theoretical test in direct ophthalmoscopy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Decentralized virtual reality mastoidectomy simulation training: a prospective, mixed-methods study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Simulation-Based Training of Ultrasound-Guided Procedures in Radiology - A Systematic Review

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Colonoscopy screening and surveillance programs depend on patient's tolerable experience, which is associated with competence of the endoscopist. The Colonoscopy Progression Score (CoPS) is an automated tool based on recording of the Magnetic Scope Imager (MEI) picture in order to track progression. CoPS deliver a numeric score and a graphic map. A high score expresses a rapid and smooth progression. Aims of study were to explore the correlation between CoPS and patient experienced pain and to identity locations associated with pain.

METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients listed for colonoscopy were included and asked to reply to pain by pressing a rubber ball. The signal was recorded simultaneous to CoPS. Patients evaluated the experience on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). CoPS and recorded pain events were used to create a pain sensitive CoPS-map (S-CoPS map).

RESULTS: A total of 58 complete recordings were used for evaluation. We demonstrated a moderate correlation between CoPS and patient experienced pain, Pearson's r = -0.47 (p < .001). A low CoPS was associated with a painful colonoscopy and a high CoPS excluded severe pain. Sensitivity and specificity was 0.79 and 0.60 and AUC was 0.61 Passage of the sigmoid colon, right and left flexures were associated with pain for 51%, 33% and 25% of the patients, respectively.

CONCLUSION: A moderate correlation between CoPS and patient experienced pain suggest that CoPS measure inserting skills but might also be a measure of a gentle performance. The graphic S-CoPS-map can be used to point-out painful passages and aid planning of future colonoscopies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume53
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)345-49
Number of pages5
ISSN0036-5521
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2018

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 52568821