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Amygdala reactivity to fearful faces correlates positively with impulsive aggression

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@article{48a7e4358f264c94bc3beb3668b8e018,
title = "Amygdala reactivity to fearful faces correlates positively with impulsive aggression",
abstract = "Facial expressions robustly activate the amygdala, a brain structure playing a critical role in aggression. Whereas previous studies suggest that amygdala reactivity is related to various measures of impulsive aggression, we here estimate a composite measure of impulsive aggression and evaluate whether it is associated with amygdala reactivity to angry and fearful faces. We estimated amygdala reactivity with functional magnetic resonance imaging in 47 men with varying degree of aggressive traits (19 incarcerated violent offenders and 28 healthy controls). We modeled a composite {"}impulsive aggression{"} trait construct (LVagg) using a linear structural equation model, with a single latent variable capturing the shared correlation between five self-report measures of trait aggression, anger and impulsivity. We tested for associations between amygdala reactivity and the LVagg, adjusting for age and group. The LVaggwas significantly positively associated with amygdala reactivity to fearful (p = 0.001), but not angry faces (p = 0.9). We found no group difference in amygdala reactivity to fearful or angry faces. The findings suggest that that amygdala reactivity to fearful faces is represented by a composite index of impulsive aggression and provide evidence that impulsive aggression is associated with amygdala reactivity in response to submissive cues, i.e., fearful faces.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "{da Cunha-Bang}, Sofi and Fisher, {Patrick M} and Hjordt, {Liv V} and Klaus Holst and Knudsen, {Gitte M}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/17470919.2017.1421262",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "162--172",
journal = "Social Neuroscience",
issn = "1747-0919",
publisher = "Psychology Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Amygdala reactivity to fearful faces correlates positively with impulsive aggression

AU - da Cunha-Bang, Sofi

AU - Fisher, Patrick M

AU - Hjordt, Liv V

AU - Holst, Klaus

AU - Knudsen, Gitte M

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Facial expressions robustly activate the amygdala, a brain structure playing a critical role in aggression. Whereas previous studies suggest that amygdala reactivity is related to various measures of impulsive aggression, we here estimate a composite measure of impulsive aggression and evaluate whether it is associated with amygdala reactivity to angry and fearful faces. We estimated amygdala reactivity with functional magnetic resonance imaging in 47 men with varying degree of aggressive traits (19 incarcerated violent offenders and 28 healthy controls). We modeled a composite "impulsive aggression" trait construct (LVagg) using a linear structural equation model, with a single latent variable capturing the shared correlation between five self-report measures of trait aggression, anger and impulsivity. We tested for associations between amygdala reactivity and the LVagg, adjusting for age and group. The LVaggwas significantly positively associated with amygdala reactivity to fearful (p = 0.001), but not angry faces (p = 0.9). We found no group difference in amygdala reactivity to fearful or angry faces. The findings suggest that that amygdala reactivity to fearful faces is represented by a composite index of impulsive aggression and provide evidence that impulsive aggression is associated with amygdala reactivity in response to submissive cues, i.e., fearful faces.

AB - Facial expressions robustly activate the amygdala, a brain structure playing a critical role in aggression. Whereas previous studies suggest that amygdala reactivity is related to various measures of impulsive aggression, we here estimate a composite measure of impulsive aggression and evaluate whether it is associated with amygdala reactivity to angry and fearful faces. We estimated amygdala reactivity with functional magnetic resonance imaging in 47 men with varying degree of aggressive traits (19 incarcerated violent offenders and 28 healthy controls). We modeled a composite "impulsive aggression" trait construct (LVagg) using a linear structural equation model, with a single latent variable capturing the shared correlation between five self-report measures of trait aggression, anger and impulsivity. We tested for associations between amygdala reactivity and the LVagg, adjusting for age and group. The LVaggwas significantly positively associated with amygdala reactivity to fearful (p = 0.001), but not angry faces (p = 0.9). We found no group difference in amygdala reactivity to fearful or angry faces. The findings suggest that that amygdala reactivity to fearful faces is represented by a composite index of impulsive aggression and provide evidence that impulsive aggression is associated with amygdala reactivity in response to submissive cues, i.e., fearful faces.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1080/17470919.2017.1421262

DO - 10.1080/17470919.2017.1421262

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 162

EP - 172

JO - Social Neuroscience

JF - Social Neuroscience

SN - 1747-0919

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 52761088