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Altered Low-Frequency EEG Connectivity in Mild Cognitive Impairment as a Sign of Clinical Progression

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BACKGROUND: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is associated with clinical progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD) but not all patients with MCI convert to AD. However, it is important to have methods that can differentiate between patients with MCI who progress (pMCI) and those who remain stable (sMCI), i.e., for timely administration of disease-modifying drugs.

OBJECTIVE: In the current study, we wanted to investigate whether quantitative EEG coherence and imaginary part of coherency (iCoh) could be used to differentiate between pMCI and sMCI.

METHODS: 17 patients with AD, 27 patients with MCI, and 38 older healthy controls were recruited and followed for three years and 2nd year was used to determine progression. EEGs were recorded at baseline and coherence and iCoh were calculated after thorough preprocessing.

RESULTS: Between pMCI and sMCI, the largest difference in total coherence was found in the theta and delta bands. Here, the significant differences for coherence and iCoh were found in the lower frequency bands involving the temporal-frontal connections for coherence and parietal-frontal connections for iCoh. Furthermore, we found a significant negative correlation between theta coherence and the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE) (p = 0.0378; rho = -0.2388).

CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that low frequency coherence and iCoh can be used to determine, which patients with MCI will progress to AD and is associated with the ACE score. Low-frequency coherence has previously been associated with increased hippocampal atrophy and degeneration of the cholinergic system and may be an early marker of AD pathology.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
Volume68
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)947-960
Number of pages14
ISSN1387-2877
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

ID: 58035876