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Adverse Events during Immunotherapy against Grass Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis - Differences between Subcutaneous and Sublingual Treatment

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@article{bc49f04228a148938d9ca2d0cf9550da,
title = "Adverse Events during Immunotherapy against Grass Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis - Differences between Subcutaneous and Sublingual Treatment",
abstract = "Allergic rhinitis triggered by grass pollen is a common disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. Treatment consists of symptom-alleviating drugs, such as topical corticosteroids or antihistamines. Another option is potentially curative immunotherapy, currently available as sublingual and subcutaneous treatment. We investigated the potential differences in the prevalence and severity of adverse events related to subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy against grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. A thorough literature search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE. The findings were compared with the available summaries of product characteristics and with commercial pharmacology databases (Micromedex). The majority of available safety data originates from registered products of standardized allergens. A surprisingly large percentage of drugs, especially those used in the United States, have no systematically collected safety data. No sufficiently powered randomized trials comparing sublingual and subcutaneous immunotherapy were available, but general safety assessments indicate that sublingual tablet treatment is safer than subcutaneous treatment. Not all commonly used immunotherapy drugs are officially registered and not all have systematically collected safety data. This is especially true for older drugs used in the United Stages. In contrast, newer drugs that have undergone extensive clinical testing have better documentation, but unified collection of safety data is still lacking. Considering the evidence available, most drugs elicit similar side effects from the same organ systems, and symptoms from the sublingual drug classes are probably less severe. However, a head-to-head comparison of safety and efficacy is lacking. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
author = "Kristian Aasbjerg and Dalhoff, {Kim Peder} and Vibeke Backer",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2015",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1111/bcpt.12416",
language = "English",
volume = "117",
pages = "73--84",
journal = "Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology Online",
issn = "1742-7843",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adverse Events during Immunotherapy against Grass Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis - Differences between Subcutaneous and Sublingual Treatment

AU - Aasbjerg, Kristian

AU - Dalhoff, Kim Peder

AU - Backer, Vibeke

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2015/8

Y1 - 2015/8

N2 - Allergic rhinitis triggered by grass pollen is a common disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. Treatment consists of symptom-alleviating drugs, such as topical corticosteroids or antihistamines. Another option is potentially curative immunotherapy, currently available as sublingual and subcutaneous treatment. We investigated the potential differences in the prevalence and severity of adverse events related to subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy against grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. A thorough literature search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE. The findings were compared with the available summaries of product characteristics and with commercial pharmacology databases (Micromedex). The majority of available safety data originates from registered products of standardized allergens. A surprisingly large percentage of drugs, especially those used in the United States, have no systematically collected safety data. No sufficiently powered randomized trials comparing sublingual and subcutaneous immunotherapy were available, but general safety assessments indicate that sublingual tablet treatment is safer than subcutaneous treatment. Not all commonly used immunotherapy drugs are officially registered and not all have systematically collected safety data. This is especially true for older drugs used in the United Stages. In contrast, newer drugs that have undergone extensive clinical testing have better documentation, but unified collection of safety data is still lacking. Considering the evidence available, most drugs elicit similar side effects from the same organ systems, and symptoms from the sublingual drug classes are probably less severe. However, a head-to-head comparison of safety and efficacy is lacking. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - Allergic rhinitis triggered by grass pollen is a common disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. Treatment consists of symptom-alleviating drugs, such as topical corticosteroids or antihistamines. Another option is potentially curative immunotherapy, currently available as sublingual and subcutaneous treatment. We investigated the potential differences in the prevalence and severity of adverse events related to subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy against grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. A thorough literature search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE. The findings were compared with the available summaries of product characteristics and with commercial pharmacology databases (Micromedex). The majority of available safety data originates from registered products of standardized allergens. A surprisingly large percentage of drugs, especially those used in the United States, have no systematically collected safety data. No sufficiently powered randomized trials comparing sublingual and subcutaneous immunotherapy were available, but general safety assessments indicate that sublingual tablet treatment is safer than subcutaneous treatment. Not all commonly used immunotherapy drugs are officially registered and not all have systematically collected safety data. This is especially true for older drugs used in the United Stages. In contrast, newer drugs that have undergone extensive clinical testing have better documentation, but unified collection of safety data is still lacking. Considering the evidence available, most drugs elicit similar side effects from the same organ systems, and symptoms from the sublingual drug classes are probably less severe. However, a head-to-head comparison of safety and efficacy is lacking. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1111/bcpt.12416

DO - 10.1111/bcpt.12416

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25968654

VL - 117

SP - 73

EP - 84

JO - Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology Online

JF - Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology Online

SN - 1742-7843

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 45344854