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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Adjusted Landing Technique Reduces the Load on the Achilles Tendon in Badminton Players

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Achilles tendon (AT) rupture is common among recreational male badminton players. We hypothesize that a landing technique following forehand jump strokes with the landing foot in a neutral position often performed by recreational players and occasionally by elite players may expose the AT to higher loads than a scissor kick jump (SKJ) technique with the leg/foot externally rotated. The study aimed to investigate if recreational players could reduce the load in the AT when adopting the SKJ technique compared to their habitual landing technique with the foot in a neutral position and secondarily to compare the AT force between recreational players and elite players. Ten recreational male players performed simulated jump strokes in a biomechanical laboratory using both their original technique and the SKJ technique traditionally used by elite players. For comparison reasons ten elite players performed SKJs. Landing kinematics and AT forces were captured and calculated using 3D movement analysis. The landing leg was more externally rotated in the recreational players' adjusted technique (78 ± 10 degrees, p < 0.001) compared to 22 ± 21 degrees in recreational players' original technique. The peak AT force of the recreational players was significantly higher for the original technique compared to the adjusted technique (68 ± 19 N/kg vs. 50 ± 14 N/kg, p = 0.005). Additionally, the peak AT forces observed during the recreational players' original technique was higher, though not significantly, than those observed for elite players (55 ± 11 N/kg, p = 0.017). / = 0.016 due to a Bonferroni correction. These findings indicate that recreational badminton players that normally land with the foot in a neutral position, may reduce their AT load by 25% when adopting the SKJ technique of elite players and land with the leg/foot in an externally rotated position.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of sports science & medicine
Volume21
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)224-232
Number of pages9
ISSN1303-2968
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2022

Bibliographical note

© Journal of Sports Science and Medicine.

    Research areas

  • Achilles Tendon, Biomechanical Phenomena, Humans, Knee Joint, Male, Racquet Sports, Stroke, Biomechanics, foot work, scissor kick jump

ID: 78893134