Acute Unstable Depressive Syndrome (AUDS) is associated more frequently with epilepsy than major depression

Arne E Vaaler, Gunnar Morken, Valentina C Iversen, Daniel Kondziella, Olav M Linaker

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Depressive disorders are frequent in epilepsy and associated with reduced seizure control. Almost 50% of interictal depressive disorders have to be classified as atypical depressions according to DSM-4 criteria. Research has mainly focused on depressive symptoms in defined populations with epilepsy (e.g., patients admitted to tertiary epilepsy centers). We have chosen the opposite approach. We hypothesized that it is possible to define by clinical means a subgroup of psychiatric patients with higher than expected prevalence of epilepsy and seizures. We hypothesized further that these patients present with an Acute Unstable Depressive Syndrome (AUDS) that does not meet DSM-IV criteria of a Major Depressive Episode (MDE). In a previous publication we have documented that AUDS patients indeed have more often a history of epileptic seizures and abnormal EEG recordings than MDE patients (Vaaler et al. 2009). This study aimed to further classify the differences of depressive symptoms at admittance and follow-up of patients with AUDS and MDE.
Original languageEnglish
JournalB M C Neurology
Volume10
Pages (from-to)67
ISSN1471-2377
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010

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