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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Acute admissions to medical departments. A comparison between an urban and a rural district.

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  • J C Hilsted
  • T Evald
  • R Elbrønd
  • G Olesen
  • A L Larsen
  • B Andersen
  • Y M Sales
  • T Gjørup
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To compare hospitalization into medical departments, acute admissions into a city hospital and into a district hospital were compared prospectively over a two-week period. Patients referred to the city hospital were on average older, were more frequently living alone and they had a greater amount of social care attendance in their homes. On the other hand, distribution of referral diagnoses, overall patient activity, occupational status and contact with relatives were similar in the two areas. Sub-acute or acute illness was considered the main cause of admission in both areas; the amount of admissions for social reasons was 13 percent to the city hospital versus 3 percent to the district hospital. Relevant alternatives to hospitalization seemed to exist in 50 percent of the admissions to the city hospital versus only 3 percent to the district hospital. Since patients admitted for social reasons block hospital beds for a longer time period than those admitted for other reasons, these differences may to some extent explain why length of hospital stay is longer in city hospitals than in rural ones.
Translated title of the contributionAcute admissions to medical departments. A comparison between an urban and a rural district.
Original languageEnglish
JournalDanish Medical Bulletin
Volume42
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)371-373
Number of pages3
ISSN0907-8916
Publication statusPublished - 1995

ID: 32493991