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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Actigraphy for measurements of sleep in relation to oncological treatment of patients with cancer: a systematic review

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  1. The role of sleep in the pathophysiology of nocturnal enuresis

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  2. Sleep and cardiometabolic risk in children and adolescents

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Sleep disturbances after non-cardiac surgery.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearch

  1. Associations between blood cultures after surgery for colorectal cancer and long-term oncological outcomes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. The clinical implication of the association between hypoxaemia and postoperative troponin I: a reply

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

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Sleep disturbances are a prevalent and disabling problem for patients with cancer. Sleep disturbances are present throughout the cancer trajectory, especially during oncological treatment. Previously sleep disturbances have primarily been quantified with subjective rating scales. Actigraphy is an easy to use, non-invasive method for objective measurement of sleep. We systematically reviewed the literature for studies using actigraphy to measure sleeping habits of patients with cancer, undergoing oncological treatment. Our study furthermore reviewed studies with interventions designed to reduce sleep disturbances in the patient population. 19 studies were included in the final review of which 13 had a descriptive study design and six included some kind of intervention. The studies were primarily performed in patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. We found that sleep disturbances are prevalent, and persistent in patients with cancer. The sleep disturbances seem to be aggravated by chemotherapy treatment and accumulate as the treatment continues. Sleep disturbances need further attention among clinicians working with patients with cancer.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSleep Medicine Reviews
Volume20
Pages (from-to)73-83
Number of pages11
ISSN1087-0792
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

    Research areas

  • Actigraphy, Humans, Neoplasms, Sleep Wake Disorders

ID: 45996790