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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Abdominal fat distribution measured by ultrasound and aerobic fitness in young Danish men born with low and normal birth weight

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Abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue thickness was examined by ultrasound in 17 men with low birth weight (LBW) and 26 with normal BW control individuals to determine if abdominal obesity in LBW individuals is due to increased visceral or subcutaneous fat mass/thickness, or both. Men born with LBW had an increased waist-to-hip ratio (P = 0.04), greater abdominal fat thickness (P = 0.05) and increased visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) thickness compared with controls, however the latter not statistically significant (P = 0.08, P = 0.10). A significant difference between birth weight groups in both SAT (P = 0.04) and VAT (P = 0.03) was found after adjustment for weight, whereas no significant difference in either SAT (P = 0.93) or VAT (P = 0.30) was found after adjustment for BMI. Increased waist-to-hip ratio in LBW individuals is due to increased total abdominal fat including both subcutaneous and visceral fat.

Original languageEnglish
JournalObesity Research & Clinical Practice
Volume13
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)529-532
Number of pages4
ISSN1871-403X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

    Research areas

  • Abdominal fat, Low birth weight, Subcutaneous fat, Ultrasound method, Visceral fat

ID: 58435551