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Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery: survival and quality of life in patients requiring prolonged postoperative intensive therapy

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  1. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Vascular Surgery: Review and Update

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  2. Risk Factors for Complications after Peripheral Vascular Surgery in 3,202 Patient Procedures

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  3. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a survey of 63 patients treated nonoperatively

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  1. 30-day mortality in frail patients undergoing cardiac surgery: the results of the frailty in cardiac surgery (FICS) copenhagen study

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  2. Long-term Thromboembolic Risk in Patients With Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation After Left-Sided Heart Valve Surgery

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  3. Micro-Lightguide Spectrophotometry (O2C) for Lower Limb Perfusion: Effects of Exercise Walking in Claudicants

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  4. Pharmacokinetics of Ferric bepectate - a new intravenous iron drug for treating iron deficiency

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The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553 patients, 51 (9%) of whom died within the first 48 hours. Of the 502 patients who survived for more than 48 hours, 109 required ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, whereas 393 patients were in the ICU for less than 48 hours. The incidence of preoperative risk factors was similar for the two groups. The cumulated survival rates for the two groups were 68% and 92% at 1 months, 52% and 88% at 1 year, and 60% and 33% at 6 years, respectively. This significant difference was primarily related to renal, pulmonary, and cardiac complications. However, assessment of the most severe complications and risk factors combined failed to permit identification of patients in whom the perioperative survival rate was 0%. Even 20% of patients with multiorgan failure survived for 6 months. Of those patients who needed ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, 41 (38%) were alive at the end of 1988. In response to a questionnaire, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume8
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)137-43
Number of pages7
ISSN0890-5096
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1994

    Research areas

  • Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal, Humans, Intensive Care, Postoperative Care, Postoperative Complications, Quality of Life, Risk Factors, Survival Rate

ID: 45305009