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A step towards a new delimitation of functional somatic syndromes: A latent class analysis of symptoms in a population-based cohort study

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@article{32cad2a6772343d48a15295211eebb29,
title = "A step towards a new delimitation of functional somatic syndromes: A latent class analysis of symptoms in a population-based cohort study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The current delimitation of functional somatic syndromes (FSS) is inconsistent. We aimed to investigate somatic symptom profiles in the general adult population to contribute to a new, data-driven delimitation of FSS.METHODS: Information on 31 self-reported somatic symptoms used in the delimitation of various FSS and bodily distress syndrome (BDS) was obtained from the DanFunD study-a population-based cohort study on 9656 adults (participation 33.6%) from Greater Copenhagen, Denmark. Latent class analysis was used to identify symptom profiles. The profiles were described by their relation with sex, age, chronic disease, self-perceived health, symptom impact, self-reported FSS, and BDS case-status.RESULTS: Eight symptom profiles were identified. The largest profile had no symptoms (49% of the population). Three profiles were characterized by a few, specific symptoms: muscle and joint pain (17%), gastrointestinal symptoms (6%), and general symptoms (13%). Three profiles had multiple symptoms in specific combinations: musculoskeletal and general symptoms (7%); fatigue, musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms (3%); and cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal and general symptoms (3%). Lastly, one profile (2%) had high probability of all symptoms. The last four profiles (15%) were strongly associated with BDS case-status, poor self-perceived health and high impact of symptoms. Analyses excluding persons with multi-symptomatic chronic disease showed similar results.CONCLUSIONS: We identified eight symptom profiles characterized by specific combinations of symptoms. Four of these had multiple symptoms from several bodily systems showing large overlap with BDS, possibly indicating subtypes of FSS. The profiles contribute to a new delimitation of FSS by illustrating the importance of specific symptom combinations.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Marie Eliasen and Andreas Schr{\"o}der and Per Fink and Svend Kreiner and Dantoft, {Thomas Meinertz} and Poulsen, {Chalotte Heinsvig} and Petersen, {Marie Weinreich} and Eplov, {Lene Falgaard} and Sine Skovbjerg and Torben J{\o}rgensen",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = may,
doi = "10.1016/j.jpsychores.2018.03.002",
language = "English",
volume = "108",
pages = "102--117",
journal = "Journal of Psychosomatic Research",
issn = "0022-3999",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A step towards a new delimitation of functional somatic syndromes

T2 - A latent class analysis of symptoms in a population-based cohort study

AU - Eliasen, Marie

AU - Schröder, Andreas

AU - Fink, Per

AU - Kreiner, Svend

AU - Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz

AU - Poulsen, Chalotte Heinsvig

AU - Petersen, Marie Weinreich

AU - Eplov, Lene Falgaard

AU - Skovbjerg, Sine

AU - Jørgensen, Torben

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/5

Y1 - 2018/5

N2 - OBJECTIVES: The current delimitation of functional somatic syndromes (FSS) is inconsistent. We aimed to investigate somatic symptom profiles in the general adult population to contribute to a new, data-driven delimitation of FSS.METHODS: Information on 31 self-reported somatic symptoms used in the delimitation of various FSS and bodily distress syndrome (BDS) was obtained from the DanFunD study-a population-based cohort study on 9656 adults (participation 33.6%) from Greater Copenhagen, Denmark. Latent class analysis was used to identify symptom profiles. The profiles were described by their relation with sex, age, chronic disease, self-perceived health, symptom impact, self-reported FSS, and BDS case-status.RESULTS: Eight symptom profiles were identified. The largest profile had no symptoms (49% of the population). Three profiles were characterized by a few, specific symptoms: muscle and joint pain (17%), gastrointestinal symptoms (6%), and general symptoms (13%). Three profiles had multiple symptoms in specific combinations: musculoskeletal and general symptoms (7%); fatigue, musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms (3%); and cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal and general symptoms (3%). Lastly, one profile (2%) had high probability of all symptoms. The last four profiles (15%) were strongly associated with BDS case-status, poor self-perceived health and high impact of symptoms. Analyses excluding persons with multi-symptomatic chronic disease showed similar results.CONCLUSIONS: We identified eight symptom profiles characterized by specific combinations of symptoms. Four of these had multiple symptoms from several bodily systems showing large overlap with BDS, possibly indicating subtypes of FSS. The profiles contribute to a new delimitation of FSS by illustrating the importance of specific symptom combinations.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The current delimitation of functional somatic syndromes (FSS) is inconsistent. We aimed to investigate somatic symptom profiles in the general adult population to contribute to a new, data-driven delimitation of FSS.METHODS: Information on 31 self-reported somatic symptoms used in the delimitation of various FSS and bodily distress syndrome (BDS) was obtained from the DanFunD study-a population-based cohort study on 9656 adults (participation 33.6%) from Greater Copenhagen, Denmark. Latent class analysis was used to identify symptom profiles. The profiles were described by their relation with sex, age, chronic disease, self-perceived health, symptom impact, self-reported FSS, and BDS case-status.RESULTS: Eight symptom profiles were identified. The largest profile had no symptoms (49% of the population). Three profiles were characterized by a few, specific symptoms: muscle and joint pain (17%), gastrointestinal symptoms (6%), and general symptoms (13%). Three profiles had multiple symptoms in specific combinations: musculoskeletal and general symptoms (7%); fatigue, musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms (3%); and cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal and general symptoms (3%). Lastly, one profile (2%) had high probability of all symptoms. The last four profiles (15%) were strongly associated with BDS case-status, poor self-perceived health and high impact of symptoms. Analyses excluding persons with multi-symptomatic chronic disease showed similar results.CONCLUSIONS: We identified eight symptom profiles characterized by specific combinations of symptoms. Four of these had multiple symptoms from several bodily systems showing large overlap with BDS, possibly indicating subtypes of FSS. The profiles contribute to a new delimitation of FSS by illustrating the importance of specific symptom combinations.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2018.03.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2018.03.002

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29602319

VL - 108

SP - 102

EP - 117

JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

JF - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

SN - 0022-3999

ER -

ID: 53714644