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A single high dose of escitalopram increases mismatch negativity without affecting processing negativity or P300 amplitude in healthy volunteers

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AbstractInformation processing deficits are commonly found in psychiatric illnesses, while at the biochemical level serotonin seems to play a role in nearly all psychiatric disorders. Processing negativity (PN), mismatch negativity (MMN) and P300 amplitude are electrophysiological measures of information processing. The present study was designed to replicate and further extent the results of our initial study on the effects of a low dose of escitalopram (10 mg) on MMN, PN and P300 amplitude. In a randomised, double-blind, cross-over experiment, 20 healthy male volunteers received either a single, orally administered dose of 15 mg escitalopram (a highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)) or placebo, after which their PN, MMN and P300 amplitude were assessed. Similar to our initial study with 10 mg escitalopram, 15 mg escitalopram significantly increased MMN, while it did not affect P300 amplitude. In contrast to our initial study, however, the currently higher dose of escitalopram did not increase PN. Results support the view that a broad range of increased serotonergic activity enhances MMN, while the relationship between serotonin and PN seems more complex. The current study does not support a serotonergic involvement in P300 amplitude.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Psychopharmacology
Volume24
Issue number8
Pages (from-to)1183-92
ISSN0269-8811
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

ID: 171402