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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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A randomised clinical trial of take-home laparoscopic training

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INTRODUCTION: Simulation-based training in surgery helps trainees master laparoscopic skills, and training at home on mobile box trainers may allow trainees to reach proficiency faster. The aim of this study was to examine the added effects of training at home.

METHODS: Participants were trainees from departments of surgery, gynaecology and urology who were recruited while taking part in a laparoscopic training course. The interven-tion consisted of added access to a mobile box trainer allowing participants to train at home.

RESULTS: During a one-year study period, 36 participants completed the trial. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of days it took to complete the course (86 days versus 89 days, p = 0.89) or in the final test scores of the two groups (493 versus 460, p = 0.07). A sig-nificant difference in the number of training sessions at-tended was found (5.8 versus 2.3, p < 0.001). Participants were able to reliably rate their own performance; the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.86, p < 0.001.

CONCLUSIONS: Trainees who had access to training at home did not pass a test earlier or achieve a higher score at the end of a course than trainees who had no such access. Improved access to training at home allowed for shorter and more frequent sessions; however, testing and mandatory training requirements apparently determine training patterns. Trainees were able to reliably rate their own performance.

FUNDING: Equipment for the study was provided by the Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulation, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was exempt from ethical approval according to Danish legislation (H-3-2014-FSP31). The trial protocol was registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov prior to commencing the trial (NCT02243215).

Original languageEnglish
JournalDanish Medical Journal
Volume66
Issue number1
ISSN1603-9629
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

    Research areas

  • Adult, Female, General Surgery/education, Gynecology/education, Humans, Internship and Residency, Laparoscopy/education, Male, Middle Aged, Simulation Training/methods, Time Factors, Urology/education

ID: 56927096