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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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A prospective study of the association between weight changes and self-rated health

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BACKGROUND: Obesity and self-rated health (SRH) are strong predictors of morbidity and mortality but their interrelation is sparsely studied. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between weight changes and changes in SRH among women. We also examined if poor SRH at baseline was associated with later weight gain.

METHODS: The Danish Nurse Cohort Study is a prospective population study (1993-1999) and comprises 13,684 female nurses aged 44 to 69 years. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between weight changes and changes in SRH.

RESULTS: Women who gained weight during the study period had higher odds of reporting poorer self-rated health (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.18, 95% CI: 1.04-1.35). Weight loss among overweight women, did not result in an increase in self-rated health ratings, in fully adjusted analyses (0.96 (95% CI: 0.76-1.23). Poor self-rated health combined with normal weight at first examination was associated with higher odds of later weight gain (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.10-1.51).

CONCLUSION: Weight changes may result in lower SRH. Further, poor self-rated health at baseline seems to predict an increase in weight, among women without any longstanding chronic diseases. Future obesity prevention may focus on normal weight individuals with poor SRH.

Original languageEnglish
JournalB M C Women's Health
Volume8
Pages (from-to)13
ISSN1472-6874
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Research areas

  • Aged, Attitude to Health, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Denmark, Family Characteristics, Female, Health Status, Humans, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Questionnaires, Self Concept, Smoking, Weight Gain, Weight Loss, Women's Health

ID: 44936869