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A Phase II Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Selinexor in Recurrent Glioblastoma

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  • Andrew B Lassman
  • Patrick Y Wen
  • Martin J van den Bent
  • Scott R Plotkin
  • Annemiek M E Walenkamp
  • Adam L Green
  • Kai Li
  • Christopher J Walker
  • Hua Chang
  • Sharon Tamir
  • Leah Henegar
  • Yao Shen
  • Mariano J Alvarez
  • Andrea Califano
  • Yosef Landesman
  • Michael G Kauffman
  • Sharon Shacham
  • Morten Mau-Sørensen
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PURPOSE: Selinexor is an oral selective inhibitor of exportin-1 (XPO1) with efficacy in various solid and hematologic tumors. We assessed intratumoral penetration, safety, and efficacy of selinexor monotherapy for recurrent glioblastoma.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventy-six adults with Karnofsky Performance Status ≥ 60 were enrolled. Patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery received up to three selinexor doses (twice weekly) preoperatively (Arm A; n = 8 patients). Patients not undergoing surgery received 50 mg/m2 (Arm B, n = 24), or 60 mg (Arm C, n = 14) twice weekly, or 80 mg once weekly (Arm D; n = 30). Primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival rate (PFS6).

RESULTS: Median selinexor concentrations in resected tumors from patients receiving presurgical selinexor was 105.4 nmol/L (range 39.7-291 nmol/L). In Arms B, C, and D, respectively, the PFS6 was 10% [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.79-35.9], 7.7% (95% CI, 1.17-50.6), and 17% (95% CI, 7.78-38.3). Measurable reduction in tumor size was observed in 19 (28%) and RANO-response rate overall was 8.8% [Arm B, 8.3% (95% CI, 1.0-27.0); C: 7.7% (95% CI, 0.2-36.0); D: 10% (95% CI, 2.1-26.5)], with one complete and two durable partial responses in Arm D. Serious adverse events (AEs) occurred in 26 (34%) patients; 1 (1.3%) was fatal. The most common treatment-related AEs were fatigue (61%), nausea (59%), decreased appetite (43%), and thrombocytopenia (43%), and were manageable by supportive care and dose modification. Molecular studies identified a signature predictive of response (AUC = 0.88).

CONCLUSIONS: At 80 mg weekly, single-agent selinexor induced responses and clinically relevant PFS6 with manageable side effects requiring dose reductions. Ongoing trials are evaluating safety and efficacy of selinexor in combination with other therapies for newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume28
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)452-460
Number of pages9
ISSN1078-0432
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2022

Bibliographical note

©2021 The Authors; Published by the American Association for Cancer Research.

ID: 70122540