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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

A personalized dementia care intervention for family carers from minority ethnic groups in Denmark: A pilot study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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  2. Barriers to post-diagnostic care and support in minority ethnic communities: A survey of Danish primary care dementia coordinators

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  3. Coping with Dementia

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  1. Feasibility of a culturally tailored dementia information program for minority ethnic communities in Denmark

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  2. Hospital readmissions following infections in dementia: a nationwide and registry-based cohort study

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  3. Global Prevalence of Young-Onset Dementia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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  4. Barriers in access to dementia care in minority ethnic groups in Denmark: a qualitative study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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BACKGROUND: There is a growing number of people with dementia in minority ethnic groups in Denmark. Support for the increasing number of family carers from minority ethnic groups is crucial, as caring for a relative with dementia may negatively affect the carer's health and quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of a personalized intervention for family carers from minority ethnic groups. The intervention was a modified version of a culturally sensitive case-management program developed in Australia which had been shown to improve carers' sense of competence in managing dementia and their mental well-being.

METHODS: A small pilot trial was used to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the intervention. Feasibility indicators included data on recruitment, retention, adherence, and fidelity. Acceptability and suitability of the intervention was explored in post-intervention interviews with family carers, and baseline and follow-up scores for outcome measures were examined.

RESULTS: Ten (30%) of 33 eligible family carers consented to participate in the study, but three were lost to follow-up and seven (70%) family carers completed the trial. Intervention fidelity, acceptance, and satisfaction were high. Results for outcome measures indicated that the intervention may improve family carers' sense of competence by helping them cope better with challenges relating to caring and managing dementia and improved their satisfaction with primary care services.

CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the intervention is feasible and worth exploring for family carers of people with dementia from minority ethnic groups in Denmark.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDementia
Pages (from-to)Ahead of print brit 191021
ISSN1471-3012
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Oct 2021

    Research areas

  • Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, family carers, minority groups, psychosocial intervention, services

ID: 68354322