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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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A nationwide study of the quality of surgical guidelines and written patient information

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  1. Prevalence of sarcopenia in a Danish geriatric out-patient population

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Feasibility and safety of outpatient breast cancer surgery

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Traumatic bicycle handlebar hernia in a child

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Self-evaluated competence in trauma reception

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  5. The effect of two grading systems on the performance of medical students during oral examinations

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  1. A national center for persistent severe pain after groin hernia repair: Five-year prospective data

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Temporal trends in length of stay and readmissions after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Indwelling urinary catheterisation may increase risk of complications in hip and knee arthroplasty

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is rare after fast-track hip- and knee arthroplasty - But potentially related to opioid use

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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INTRODUCTION: Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) support enhanced post-operative recovery and decrease morbidity. In addition, patient information leaflets (PILs) are associated with enhanced overall outcomes and improved patient satisfaction. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the quality of CPGs and PILs in cancer surgery departments undertaking pulmonary lobectomy, nephrectomy, cystectomy, whipples, colorectal and ovarian surgery.

METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study within 44 surgical departments in six cancer subspecialties: lung (n = 4), kidney (n = 9), bladder (n = 5), pancreas (n = 4), colorectal (n = 18) and ovarian (n = 4). Local CPGs were assessed according to nine key elements, i.e. discharge criteria and plans for mobilisation, pain management, nutrition, fluid, nausea and vomiting, antibiotics, bowel movements and urinary drainage. The PILs were evaluated using the DISCERN tool.

RESULTS: All departments had CPGs and PILs. Overall, 43% of the departments incorporated all nine key elements in the CPGs. Yet, a third of the CPGs lacked well-defined discharge criteria, and half of the PILs were of poor/very poor quality (48%); the remainder were fair (43%) or good (10%).

CONCLUSIONS: CPGs and PILs are highly available in Danish departments that perform cancer surgery. However, this study revealed that local CPGs lacked discharge criteria, and the majority of the PILs were considered of poor quality, suggesting that post-operative management after cancer surgery is of varying quality.

FUNDING: not relevant.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDanish Medical Journal
Volume65
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)A5491
ISSN2245-1919
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

ID: 54683564