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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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A national Danish proof of concept on feasibility and safety of home -based intensive chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

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Technological advances have made it possible to offer home-based chemotherapy to patients without health care professionals being present. Prior studies on effects of home-based treatment lack inclusion of patients with hematologic malignancies. We present data from a multicenter single-arm feasibility and safety study of home-based intensive chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia and their quality of life and psychological wellbeing. This national study included patients from six sites in Denmark who received intensive chemotherapy on programmed CADD Solis infusion pumps through a central venous catheter and were also managed as outpatients during treatment-induced pancytopenia. Data are presented from 104 patients, receiving 272 treatments with 1.096 (mean 4.57, SD 3.0) home infusion days out of 1.644 treatment days (67 %). Sixty-two of 168 (36.9 %) reinduction and consolidation treatment cycles ensuing pancytopenia phases were solely handled in the outpatient clinic. Patients reported high satisfaction with home-based treatment, which had a positive influence on their ability to be involved in their treatment and be socially and physically active. No unexpected events occurred during the intervention. Overall, patients improved in all quality of life outcomes over time. Home-based intensive chemotherapy treatment was feasible and safe in this population. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT04904211.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106756
JournalLeukemia Research
Volume112
Pages (from-to)106756
ISSN0145-2126
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Research areas

  • Acute myeloid leukemia, Feasibility, Home-based, Intensive chemotherapy, Outpatient, Safety

ID: 69452051